The parks of the Pacific region, from Yosemite’s austere Half Dome to Sequoia’s eponymous trees, speak to our adventurous spirit. We dream of visiting the lowest point in North America (Badwater Basin) and climbing the highest peak in the contiguous U.S. (Mt. Whitney). Hawaii’s tropical parks top our bucket lists, and we aspire to learn more about our country’s varied history at sites such as Manzanar National Historic Site. Based in Oakland, California, NPCA’s Pacific Regional Office—and its four field offices—focuses on raising the protections and profiles of the exceptional parks of American Samoa, California, Guam, Hawaii, and Nevada.

The dedicated staff of the Pacific region champion a diversity of park campaigns. Pushing to establish new national monuments in California and Nevada (like the mammoth-filled Tule Springs Fossil Beds), they also strive to enlarge existing parks like Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area. They fight ill-advised energy developments near the fragile desert ecosystems of Mojave and Death Valley, and collaborate to protect the precious water resources at Kaloko-Honokohoa National Historical Park.

Through their diligent efforts, a new water trail was designated along a portion of the Colorado River within Lake Mead National Recreation Area, the first marine wilderness in the continental United States was defended at Drakes Estero in Point Reyes National Seashore, and wildlife migratory routes were protected from a proposed industrial-scale solar project in the scenic Silurian Valley.

Moving forward, they’ll continue to prioritize their wildlife and natural resource work while also branching out to further their engagement of urban populations near Las Vegas and Los Angeles. There are uphill battles on the horizon, but we hope you’ll take a stand with the Pacific office to protect these amazing parks for today and for all of the tomorrows.

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Field offices in the Pacific region ›

Badwater Basin

Badwater Basin is a truly superlative location. At 282 feet below sea level, it is both the lowest and driest point in North America, and its record-setting temperature of 134 degrees Fahrenheit makes it the hottest place on Earth. The massive salt flat covers nearly 200 square miles of Death Valley National Park, and lies more than two miles below the 11,331-foot Telescope Peak that looms above it.

Field Offices in the Pacific Region

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