Just outside the boundary of Joshua Tree National Park, the region known as Eagle Mountain has been at the center of controversy over inappropriate, harmful development proposals for years. Incorporating these lands into the park could help protect them from the latest threat, the Eagle Crest Pumped Storage Project. This massive energy development stands to pump millions of gallons of water from the fragile desert aquifer in and around the park.

Joshua Tree National Park is a biodiverse gem with a rich history and culture and outstanding recreational opportunities. The park is in an ecologically unique transition zone between the Mojave and Colorado Desert ecosystems, providing the perfect conditions for a diverse assemblage of plants and animals, including a herd of approximately 250 bighorn sheep and 250 species of birds.

The Eagle Mountain area in the southeast region of Joshua Tree National Park is home to golden eagles, desert tortoises, bighorn sheep and important prehistoric and historic resources, from Native American archaeological sites to General Patton’s training camps to a World War II-era mine. The Eagle Mountain area was originally included in the lands that became Joshua Tree National Park, but Congress removed this region from the park for mineral exploration in 1950. The majority of these lands are now managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), but also include lands that are owned or managed by private owners and other entities.

Unfortunately, developers have proposed some of the most harmful environmental projects in the California desert during BLM’s management of the area, including the recently defeated Eagle Mountain Landfill and a potential hydropower plant known as the Eagle Crest Pumped Storage Project.

In 2016, the National Park Service completed the Joshua Tree National Park Eagle Mountain Boundary Study. It found that the transfer of these lands was feasible and desirable. The National Park Service received more than 9,000 comments for their study, the overwhelming majority in support of the transfer.

Now, the transfer is underway, and we must ensure that these BLM lands will not be developed.

Return Eagle Mountain to Joshua Tree National Park

NPCA supports the administrative transfer of over 22,515 acres of BLM and state lands to Joshua Tree National Park. NPCA also supports restoring the historic 1936 boundary of Joshua Tree National Park, including private lands and lands proposed for the Eagle Mountain Mine and the Eagle Crest Pumped Storage Project, when and if those lands become available.

These actions would give the highest level of protection for these critical resources and important wildlife habitat and offer the best opportunities for public recreation. Now is the time to return these lands to Joshua Tree National Park as originally envisioned decades ago.

Effort-to-date

  • NPCA Supporters Urge NPS to Add Eagle Mountain Lands

    Dec 2015

    More than 11,000 NPCA supporters sent letters to the National Park Service in support of adding the Eagle Mountain lands back to Joshua Tree National Park.

  • Supporters tell BLM to protect Joshua Tree NP

    Jan 2016

    More than 8,600 national park advocates sent letters to the Bureau of Land Management asking it to protect Joshua Tree NP from the ill-conceived Eagle Crest Pumped Storage Project.

  • Supporters Urge Eagle Mountain Transfer

    Jun 2016

    More than 10,500 NPCA supporters took action by asking Joshua Tree National Park Superintendent David Smith to recommend the transfer of the maximum amount of Eagle Mountain lands to the park through administrative action.

  • 9,500 Urge BLM to Perform a More Thorough Review

    Dec 2016

    Thousands of park advocates took action by asking the BLM to do a more thorough review of the proposed Eagle Crest Pumped Storage Project.

  • More than 11,000 Letters Sent to NPS/DOI for Lands Transfer

    Feb 2017

    Thousands of park advocates once again spoke up in support of the return of the Eagle Mountain lands to Joshua Tree National Park.

Sign Up

Get Action Alerts

action alerts graphic

Want national parks in your inbox? Sign up for NPCA email updates to receive news, features, and opportunities to make a difference! You can unsubscribe at any time.