The jagged rocks at this park formed from the remains of an ancient volcano. This volcano used to be located about 200 miles south of its current location, but tectonic forces along the San Andreas Fault moved these rocks at a pace of a little more than half an inch per year over a period of 23 million years to what is now the national park. Today, these towering spires attract hikers and climbers, as well as falcons, golden eagles and California condors. The park also features grasslands, chaparral, forests and rare talus caves.

The Bee's Knees

Pinnacles is home to nearly 400 different types of bees, a higher density of bee species than any other known place in the world.

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