Press Release Sep 2, 2016

Grand Teton National Park Wildlife, Visitors to Benefit from Final Moose-Wilson Road Plan

The National Park Service's final Moose-Wilson Corridor plan puts Grand Teton National Park on track to preserve the corridor’s unique resources for the long term. The popular road corridor is home to grizzly bears, moose, wolves and other iconic wildlife as well as significant Native American archaeological resources.

Jackson, WY – Today, Grand Teton National Park officials released the final Moose-Wilson Corridor Comprehensive Management Plan, including a recommendation and analysis that are the result of years of community engagement and scientific study specific to the historic 7.7 mile stretch of road. Increased vehicle traffic has diminished the visitor experience and created negative effects over the years on wildlife that rely on the Moose-Wilson Road Corridor. The popular road corridor is home to grizzly bears, moose, wolves and other iconic wildlife as well as significant Native American archaeological resources.

Below is a statement by Sharon Mader, Grand Teton Program Manager, National Parks Conservation Association

“National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA) believes the National Park Service’s final plan puts Grand Teton National Park on track to preserve the Moose-Wilson Road corridor’s unique resources for the long term. This careful planning is essential to the health of this crowned jewel and its visitors and wildlife.”

“With its stunning scenery and historic and cultural resources, a drive along the Moose-Wilson Road is one that visitors should take slowly. The Park Service honors this with a speed reduction and capacity limits on the road to ensure that no more than 200 cars are driving along it at once, particularly during the busy summer months. Such actions will also benefit cyclists who share the road with vehicles. Reducing conflicts between visitors and grizzly bears, wolves and other wildlife is a top priority in the final plan, with its common-sense call for closures when the animals roam close to the road.”

“We are also pleased to hear that Park Service officials will continue to study visitor use to inform a future transit system. This is an incredibly important issue for this part of the park.“

“NPCA commends the National Park Service staff who developed scientific and cultural studies over several years and engaged with the community to shape and fine tune the plan.”

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About National Parks Conservation Association

Since 1919, the nonpartisan National Parks Conservation Association has been the leading voice in safeguarding our national parks. NPCA and its more than one million supporters work together to protect and preserve our nation’s natural, historical, and cultural heritage for future generations. For more information, visit www.npca.org.