Statue of Liberty National Monument

The statue stands on Liberty Island in New York, and overlooks New York Harbor and the city skyline. A symbol of liberty and relief from oppression, she was the first sight of America for US immigrants who arrived by boat.

The Statue of Liberty National Monument, which has come to be known as “Lady Liberty”, was a gift from the French in 1886, and is a beautiful work of art. She holds the torch of enlightenment and the tablet of knowledge. She walks over broken shackles at her feet to defy persecution.

A museum exhibit at the Monument explains her history and significance. Knowledgeable rangers lead tours around the island and give the story behind the statue.

Visit the monument to appreciate the statue that has become an icon of the United States and the country’s commitment to freedom.

—Caroline Griffith

Read More in NPCA's Park Advocate Blog

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WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Ernie

November 3, 2013

I went to the Statue of Liberty with my mom on her birthday which is on August 20th of 2013 and she is beautiful and very vibrant in Upper New York Bay. This was our fifth time together and we can't wait to visit her again next year.

JJK

May 29, 2012

I just heard an amazing song about the statue . Written and sung by a great Irish singer after visiting it. What a treasure

Crzysteph

November 10, 2011

How can anyone describe this experience except for All-American? I think I've been here 3 times and although the steps are a bit exhausting, it is definitely worth going to see. Plus the ferry is fun to ride.

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