Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway

Free flowing and unpolluted, the Namekagon and St. Croix Rivers flow through some of the most scenic and least developed country in the Upper Midwest. Today 252 miles of these rivers are preserved as part of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. 

The St. Croix National Scenic Riverway, which includes the Namekagon, was established in 1968 as one of the original eight rivers under the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. The Lower St. Croix National Scenic Riverway was added to the system in 1972. Together they form a Riverway that offers outdoor enthusiasts a chance to enjoy a wilderness-like experience and a variety of outdoor recreation opportunities. 

On the upper St. Croix and Namekagon Rivers, rapids challenge the canoeist (although none of the Riverway’s waters are classified as whitewater). At the lower end, where the river widens out as Lake St. Croix, power and sail boating are popular. Campers, picnickers, swimmers, and birdwatchers enjoy its variety of scenes throughout. Anglers are attracted by the variety of fish lurking in the rivers, from trout and bass to muskellunge and sturgeon.

Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway

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WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Parkabetter

February 12, 2013

Please do not destroy this incredible area. It's a place I go to for solace and solitude, where I can find peace away from the world. There are miles of river that seem untouched by civilization, where the water is too shallow to allow any but the smallest boats. Letting industry in just to mine fracking sand? Wow, what a horrible, horrible travesty that would be.

Kelly

February 11, 2013

This river way is not just home, but a majestic area for beloved wildlife, for park lovers to enjoy hiking and camping the untouched scenery and for water lovers to fish, canoe and swim. STOP the mining before nature is destroyed everywhere!!

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