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YOU can help protect your national parks!

Help us reach our $401,000 goal by 12/31 so we can start 2015 strong defending them.

The national parks are yours.

Make your year-end, tax-deductible contribution to protect them today!

YOU can help protect your national parks!

Help us reach our $401,000 goal by 12/31 so we can start 2015 strong defending them.

The national parks are yours.

Make your year-end, tax-deductible contribution to protect them today!

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Photo: National Park Service

Prince William Forest Park

Only 35 miles from Washington, D.C., in Northern Virginia, is the largest green space in the D.C. Metropolitan region- the Prince William Forest Park. The park is a 15,000 acre woodland of piedmont forest and is the largest piedmont forest under the protection of the National Park Service. The park has 37 miles of trails to hike and 21 miles of scenic roads to drive or bike. As a visitor, you can rent one of the 100+ historic cabins in the park, built in the 1930s by the Civilian Construction Corps.

The park has an incredible human history that dates back to 8,000 B.C. Archaeological digs in the forest have uncovered artifacts from Native American habitation in the Archaic period, European settlement, the Colonial period, the Revolutionary War, and the Civil War.

A short trip from the nation’s capital, the Prince William Forest Park is a gem of Virginia woodland and cultural history.

—Caroline Griffith

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