Close Window ☒

YOU can help protect your national parks!

Help us reach our $401,000 goal by 12/31 so we can start 2015 strong defending them.

The national parks are yours.

Make your year-end, tax-deductible contribution to protect them today!

YOU can help protect your national parks!

Help us reach our $401,000 goal by 12/31 so we can start 2015 strong defending them.

The national parks are yours.

Make your year-end, tax-deductible contribution to protect them today!

Gift Amount
Photo: National Park Service

Poverty Point National Monument

When you think of massive architectural wonders built by ancient civilizations, you probably think of the Great Pyramids in Egypt and the Mayan temples in Central America.

Louisiana has its own monument to ancient ingenuity. Poverty Point National Monument covers 400 acres along the Mississippi River where a sophisticated civilization left behind a colossal mystery.

Sometime between 1650 and 700 B.C., the people living in this part of northeastern Louisiana built a series of huge earthworks rising five feet in the air. The mounds are divided into six concentric rows further separated into six discrete sections. The formation extends for three quarters of a mile.

What purpose did the ridges serve? Were they the foundations of larger structures?

Archaeological evidence suggests that if people lived here, they also traveled extensively. Remains of vessels made from Appalachian soapstone and spearheads crafted from Ozark stone have been found at the site.

One thing is clear: Building these mounds required extraordinary effort and skill. Dirt was carried in from miles away and piled according to a precise architectural blueprint.

Explore the mystery of Poverty Point National Historic Monument through museum exhibits and a site tour.

Sun Coast Regional Header

FIND A PARK:

FIND BY LOCATION:

FIND BY CATEGORY:

FIND BY THEME:

BROWSE ALPHABETICALLY:

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Post a Comment

Share your park story today. Post your park experiences, recommendations, or tips here.*

Nickname
Comment
Email
   
Enter this word:

* Your comments will appear once approved by the moderator. NPCA staff do not regularly respond to postings. We reserve the right to remove comments that include profanity or personal attacks, promote products or services, or are otherwise off-topic. Opinions expressed here do not necessarily reflect the position(s) of NPCA. By submitting comments you are giving NPCA permission to reuse your words on our website and print materials.

Close

Want to learn more about the  ?

The   can be seen in the wild in America’s national parks. Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect parks in   & other states

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect   and other National Parks

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Please leave this field empty
Yes, please sign me up for NPCA’s newsletter and other emails about protecting our national parks!

National Parks Conservation Association
National Parks Conservation Association

Log In

Or log in with your connected Facebook or Twitter account:

GO

Welcome to our growing community of park advocates. Thanks for signing up!

Sign Up:

Or sign up by connecting your Facebook or Twitter account:

GO