Guadalupe Mountains National Park

Guadalupe Mountains National Park protects one of the world’s best examples of an ancient, marine fossil reef.  A huge tropical ocean reached from the Atlantic Ocean all the way to West Texas 250 million years ago, allowing sponges, algae, and other marine organisms to build up a reef along the shoreline for 400 miles. After the ocean receded, the reef was buried in thick layers of sediment and was entombed for millions of years until geological uplift exposed it in the middle of dry west Texas. Today the park preserves this unique, globally significant exposed Permian Fossil Reef.

Each year, tens of thousands of hikers, equestrian users, and backpackers visit Guadalupe to experience the vast rugged wilderness and solitude of this isolated park.  The rugged wilderness of the park, including the highest peak in Texas, allows these visitors outstanding opportunities for solitude, challenge, self-reliance, and reflection.

—Felicia Carr & Suzanne Dixon, NPCA

gumo.jpg

Threats

Like most of the parks of the National Park System, the national parks of Texas face serious challenges as we move toward the National Park Centennial Year of 2016.  These include the need to acquire adjoining, threatened lands, air and water pollution, under-funding and under-staffing, inappropriate use of off-road vehicles, and the challenges of Texas’s location on an international border. 

FIND A PARK:

FIND BY LOCATION:

FIND BY CATEGORY:

FIND BY THEME:

BROWSE ALPHABETICALLY:

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Carl

October 16, 2013

This is a unique park, desert mountain lands surrounded by miles of flat lands. It is very rewarding for those looking for different plants and terrain. My daughter and I almost hiked to the top of Mt. Guadalupe (we underestimated our water supply and heck we were tired) we were high enough to see the tops of other mountains around us and deep into Texas. This is a neat park. I recommend doing this in conjunction with Carlsbad Caverns. Note: Bring plenty of water if you plan to hike.

Fredlyfish4

November 23, 2011

This is a great park in fall. Read about my trip here http://highpoweredplanet.blogspot.com/2011/11/guadalupe-peak-texas.html http://highpoweredplanet.blogspot.com/2011/11/devils-hall-texas.html

Textycoon

November 10, 2011

Amazing park. Always heard interesting things, but finally had a chance to go there myself this summer. The summary above couldn't be more accurate. Guadalupe peak challenges you, but the view from the top is well worth the effort. Peaceful and harmonious.....THIS is TEXAS....

Post a Comment

Share your park story today. Post your park experiences, recommendations, or tips here.*

Nickname
Comment
Email
   
Enter this word:

* Your comments will appear once approved by the moderator. NPCA staff do not regularly respond to postings. We reserve the right to remove comments that include profanity or personal attacks, promote products or services, or are otherwise off-topic. Opinions expressed here do not necessarily reflect the position(s) of NPCA. By submitting comments you are giving NPCA permission to reuse your words on our website and print materials.

Close

Want to learn more about the  ?

The   can be seen in the wild in America’s national parks. Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect parks in   & other states

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect   and other National Parks

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Please leave this field empty
Yes, please sign me up for NPCA’s newsletter and other emails about protecting our national parks!

National Parks Conservation Association
National Parks Conservation Association

Log In

Or log in with your connected Facebook or Twitter account:

GO

Welcome to our growing community of park advocates. Thanks for signing up!

Sign Up:

Or sign up by connecting your Facebook or Twitter account:

GO