Eisenhower National Historic Site

He was a hero of World War II and, many believe, one of America’s best presidents. But at heart, Dwight D. Eisenhower was a farmer. Discover the peaceful spot in the shadow of South Mountain that Ike and his wife Mamie called their home away from the White House.

Just steps from the Gettysburg Battlefield, the Eisenhower National Historic Site still looks much as it did in the 1950s. Most of the family’s original furnishings remain in the home. Here, President Eisenhower met with world leaders during the height of the Cold War. Here, Ike and Mamie relaxed, far from the hubbub of Washington, D.C.

Stroll the grounds of this working farm while listening to a free narration over your cell phone. There’s a new show herd of black Angus, the same breed Ike raised, in the barn. The skeet range is still out back. Keep your eyes peeled overhead for red-tailed hawks, black vultures, and the bald eagle that returns every fall.

Demonstrations and exhibits take you inside the life of the president and his family. Learn how the Secret Service secured the farm, recall Ike’s legendary military career, and discover what made Mamie one of the nation’s most popular first ladies.

Did You Know 

Camp David, the Maryland retreat now used by U.S. presidents, was named for Eisenhower’s grandson.

Eisenhower National Historic Site

FIND A PARK:

FIND BY LOCATION:

FIND BY CATEGORY:

FIND BY THEME:

BROWSE ALPHABETICALLY:

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Post a Comment

Share your park story today. Post your park experiences, recommendations, or tips here.*

Nickname
Comment
Email
   
Enter this word:

* Your comments will appear once approved by the moderator. NPCA staff do not regularly respond to postings. We reserve the right to remove comments that include profanity or personal attacks, promote products or services, or are otherwise off-topic. Opinions expressed here do not necessarily reflect the position(s) of NPCA. By submitting comments you are giving NPCA permission to reuse your words on our website and print materials.

Close

Want to learn more about the  ?

The   can be seen in the wild in America’s national parks. Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect parks in   & other states

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect   and other National Parks

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Please leave this field empty
Yes, please sign me up for NPCA’s newsletter and other emails about protecting our national parks!

National Parks Conservation Association
National Parks Conservation Association

Log In

Or log in with your connected Facebook or Twitter account:

GO

Welcome to our growing community of park advocates. Thanks for signing up!

Sign Up:

Or sign up by connecting your Facebook or Twitter account:

GO