Big Cypress National Preserve

One of the nation’s first established preserves, Big Cypress Swamp encompasses more than 700,000 fresh water acres that support a dizzying array of wildlife, from alligators and great white heron to black bears and the famed Florida panther.

The natural bounty of the swamp attracted American Indian tribes, including the Miccosukee and Seminole, as well as early Spanish settlers.

Following the completion of the Tamiami Trail in 1928, a road that connects Tampa and Miami, loggers moved in to harvest this massive cypress forest. Historians are just beginning to document the contributions of the African Americans who built the road and worked in the sawmills.

Considered by many to be “Florida’s backyard,” the Big Cypress Swamp offers a variety of recreational and educational activities, including ranger walks, hiking, and hunting. Off-road vehicles and airboats allow visitors to explore the park’s depths.

Get oriented at the Oasis Visitor Center, where you’ll find informative displays and educational guides to the history and natural resources of the region.

If You Go

The Florida Trail winds through Big Cypress Swamp. Less ambitious hikers can take a one-mile walk around the Kirby Storter Boardwalk – alone or led by a ranger – and get a closer look at native plants, birds, fish, otters and other wildlife.

bicy.jpg

FIND A PARK:

FIND BY LOCATION:

FIND BY CATEGORY:

FIND BY THEME:

BROWSE ALPHABETICALLY:

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Anonymous

April 26, 2013

Worst place ever

Anonymous

January 23, 2012

The Big Cypress Swamp is truely beautiful and there is always something wonderful to see everywhere you look.

Mykal

January 5, 2012

This place is alive, a must see

Post a Comment

Share your park story today. Post your park experiences, recommendations, or tips here.*

Nickname
Comment
Email
   
Enter this word:

* Your comments will appear once approved by the moderator. NPCA staff do not regularly respond to postings. We reserve the right to remove comments that include profanity or personal attacks, promote products or services, or are otherwise off-topic. Opinions expressed here do not necessarily reflect the position(s) of NPCA. By submitting comments you are giving NPCA permission to reuse your words on our website and print materials.

Close

Want to learn more about the  ?

The   can be seen in the wild in America’s national parks. Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect parks in   & other states

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect   and other National Parks

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Please leave this field empty
Yes, please sign me up for NPCA’s newsletter and other emails about protecting our national parks!

National Parks Conservation Association
National Parks Conservation Association

Log In

Or log in with your connected Facebook or Twitter account:

GO

Welcome to our growing community of park advocates. Thanks for signing up!

Sign Up:

Or sign up by connecting your Facebook or Twitter account:

GO