Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

More than 12,000 years ago, many archaeologists believe the first migrants from what is now Siberia crossed over a vast stretch of frozen tundra into the Western Hemisphere.

In northwest Alaska, the Bering Land Bridge National Preserve lies closer to Russia than to Anchorage. In fact, natives of this area speak the same language and observe the same traditions as their kin who live across the Bering Strait.

Visitors to this remote wilderness come to experience one of the nation’s last untamed frontiers. There are no roads or services in the park. Backcountry campers can hike the rugged granite tors (rock outcrops), glimpse raptors and waterfowl, explore ancient lava fields, and relax in the Serpentine Hot Springs. A bunkhouse near the Springs is available on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Easier access to the unique history, culture, geology, flora, and fauna of this region can be found at the Bering Land Bridge interpretive center in Nome.

If You Go 

The park is open year round, but flights in and out depend on the weather. There are no services, so visitors must be prepared to bring in and carry out all necessary equipment and food. Consult the park’s administrative office for more information to plan your trip.

Did You Know 

The Bering Land Bridge was more than 1,000 miles wide at one point in time.

bela.jpg

FIND A PARK:

FIND BY LOCATION:

FIND BY CATEGORY:

FIND BY THEME:

BROWSE ALPHABETICALLY:

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Post a Comment

Share your park story today. Post your park experiences, recommendations, or tips here.*

Nickname
Comment
Email
   
Enter this word:

* Your comments will appear once approved by the moderator. NPCA staff do not regularly respond to postings. We reserve the right to remove comments that include profanity or personal attacks, promote products or services, or are otherwise off-topic. Opinions expressed here do not necessarily reflect the position(s) of NPCA. By submitting comments you are giving NPCA permission to reuse your words on our website and print materials.

Close

Want to learn more about the  ?

The   can be seen in the wild in America’s national parks. Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect parks in   & other states

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect   and other National Parks

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Please leave this field empty
Yes, please sign me up for NPCA’s newsletter and other emails about protecting our national parks!

National Parks Conservation Association
National Parks Conservation Association

Log In

Or log in with your connected Facebook or Twitter account:

GO

Welcome to our growing community of park advocates. Thanks for signing up!

Sign Up:

Or sign up by connecting your Facebook or Twitter account:

GO