Apostle Islands National Lakeshore

Congress established Apostle Islands National Lakeshore in 1970. The park consists of 22 islands in Lake Superior, and 2,500 acres of a peninsula in Wisconsin. Early French fur traders named the region the Chequamegon, after a Chippewa Indian description. The fur trade was one of the area's longest lasting commercial enterprises.

At Apostle Islands visitors will find beautiful sandstone cliffs, which follow along Lake Superior’s edge. During the Ice Age, huge glaciers advanced and retreated through the region, sculpting the sandstone bedrock and enlarging channels between what would become the Apostle Islands. As the last of the Ice Age glaciers retreated, boreal forests of balsam, spruce, and paper birch advanced northward onto the moist tundra. Today, the Apostle Islands lie within a transitional zone where boreal and northern forests meet.

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Trips

Isle Royale Wilderness Sojourn

Isle Royale National Park is a road-less wilderness island accessible only by boat or float plane. Get an insider’s look at the world’s longest running wolf/moose interaction study as we Lake Superior's beautiful coastline along the Wisconsin and Michigan borders. Only 2 spots left on this summer sojourn to Isle Royale!

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NPCA Web

November 29, 2011

Yes, Apostle Islands will be featured on a national park quarter in 2018. Here is a link for more information. http://www.usmint.gov/mint_programs/atb/

DW

November 28, 2011

Is this the site that will be featured on quarters as part of the National Parks Quarter Program?

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