Close Window ☒

YOU can help protect your national parks!

Help us reach our $401,000 goal by 12/31 so we can start 2015 strong defending them.

The national parks are yours.

Make your year-end, tax-deductible contribution to protect them today!

YOU can help protect your national parks!

Help us reach our $401,000 goal by 12/31 so we can start 2015 strong defending them.

The national parks are yours.

Make your year-end, tax-deductible contribution to protect them today!

Gift Amount
Photo: National Park Service

Sources of Air Pollution

Above: Air pollution comes from many sources, though coal-fired power plants are a major contributor, such as the Navajo Generating Station in Arizona, shown above.

NPCA at Work | Cleaning Up Haze | Victories | Reports | Pollution in Parks | Sources

Where Does Haze Pollution Come From?

Regional haze comes from many sources of pollution over a wide area. Coal-fired power plants are responsible for a significant portion of the regional haze in the U.S., along with other industrial facilities like refineries, cement plants, and paper mills. But a large number of other sources—like cars, or oil and gas activities—can add up to big contributions too. There are also natural sources of haze, like forest fires or dust storms. However, the law only deals with the haze caused by humans.

The pollution from these sources comes together and creates small particles in the atmosphere. Because they’re very small, these particles can travel a long, long way and have a serious impact over a broad area—that’s why it’s called “regional” haze. For instance, pollution from the Midwest can end up over parks in New England, many states away. Wherever it comes from, when pollution reaches park skies, air resources are impacted. Fortunately, the law requires that those impacts be mitigated.

Close

Want to learn more about the  ?

The   can be seen in the wild in America’s national parks. Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect parks in   & other states

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect   and other National Parks

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Please leave this field empty
Yes, please sign me up for NPCA’s newsletter and other emails about protecting our national parks!

National Parks Conservation Association
National Parks Conservation Association

Log In

Or log in with your connected Facebook or Twitter account:

GO

Welcome to our growing community of park advocates. Thanks for signing up!

Sign Up:

Or sign up by connecting your Facebook or Twitter account:

GO