Upper Delaware Scenic And Recreational River

The history of the Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River parallels the story of American immigration, settlement, trade, and industrialization.

People have inhabited the river valley for at least 10,000 years. Woodland Indians farmed here 3,000 years ago. Minsi Indians greeted the Dutch traders who passed through in the early 1600s. Swedes and Connecticut Yankees settled in the rolling hills, followed by Irish railroad builders and German farmers.

Designed in 1847 by John Roebling, the architect who would later build the Brooklyn Bridge, the Delaware Aqueduct is America’s oldest wire cable suspension bridge and a civil engineering marvel.

You can think about all that—or nothing at all—as you float down this gorgeous river. Feel the cool breeze off the water tickle your skin. Watch the skies for a bald eagle soaring on the rising thermals.

The Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River offers relaxation for those who seek a respite from the city, and excitement for those who enjoy fishing, hiking, hunting, boating, canoeing, and all manner of water sports.

Bring along a good book, maybe something by Zane Grey? He lived and wrote here for many years, including descriptions of his fishing trips to the Upper Delaware in many of his popular novels.

Upper Delaware Scenic And Recreational River

FIND A PARK:

FIND BY LOCATION:

FIND BY CATEGORY:

FIND BY THEME:

BROWSE ALPHABETICALLY:

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Post a Comment

Share your park story today. Post your park experiences, recommendations, or tips here.*

Nickname
Comment
Email
   
Enter this word:

* Your comments will appear once approved by the moderator. NPCA staff do not regularly respond to postings. We reserve the right to remove comments that include profanity or personal attacks, promote products or services, or are otherwise off-topic. Opinions expressed here do not necessarily reflect the position(s) of NPCA. By submitting comments you are giving NPCA permission to reuse your words on our website and print materials.

Close

Want to learn more about the  ?

The   can be seen in the wild in America’s national parks. Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect parks in   & other states

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect   and other National Parks

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Please leave this field empty
Yes, please sign me up for NPCA’s newsletter and other emails about protecting our national parks!

National Parks Conservation Association
National Parks Conservation Association

Log In

Or log in with your connected Facebook or Twitter account:

GO

Welcome to our growing community of park advocates. Thanks for signing up!

Sign Up:

Or sign up by connecting your Facebook or Twitter account:

GO