Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site

Ulysses S. Grant, the eighteenth President of the United States, is well known for his leadership and successful campaigns against the Confederate army as a Union General in the American Civil War. His presidency was marked, in part, by his strong support for civil rights of African Americans.

Ulysses S. Grant National Historic site is the family home of Grant's wife, Julia Dent. The estate, named White Haven, was owned by his father-in-law, Colonel Dent. Grant, Julia and their children lived at White Haven for several years, where Ulysses managed the farm and worked alongside Colonel Dent's slaves. This may have influenced Grant's role as the General who led the Union to victory in the war that abolished slavery. Grant had planned to retire to White Haven, and in fact, retained ownership of the property until his death in 1885.

A museum in the old barn on the property contains many artifacts associated with the Grants. Julia Dent Grant, as equally intriguing as her husband, was an avid wildlife and birdwatcher, mother, farmer, businesswoman, and politician.

It is interesting to note that White Haven is not "white" at all, rather a particularly interesting shade of green. Julia Dent Grant commissioned this color, called "Paris" green, as bright colors during this era symbolized affluence.

—Ann Froschauer

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