Close Window ☒

YOU can help protect your national parks!

Help us reach our $401,000 goal by 12/31 so we can start 2015 strong defending them.

The national parks are yours.

Make your year-end, tax-deductible contribution to protect them today!

YOU can help protect your national parks!

Help us reach our $401,000 goal by 12/31 so we can start 2015 strong defending them.

The national parks are yours.

Make your year-end, tax-deductible contribution to protect them today!

Gift Amount
Photo: National Park Service

New River Gorge National River

Established in 1978, the New River Gorge National River has a wealth of recreational opportunities, as well as historic and natural resources to explore. Each year, more than one million visitors come to enjoy whitewater rafting, rock climbing, camping, fishing, hiking, mountain biking, boating, and sightseeing. The Gorge also features a rich mining history, which can be experienced today in visits to the Kaymoor mine site and the Thurmond Historic District, once home to a bustling mining and logging community.

If You Go

One of the most popular activities in the park is the annual Bridge Day Festival. The festival is held the third Saturday in October every year in Fayette County, West Virginia. Each year hundreds of thousands of people come to walk on the bridge, take in the scenic vistas of the gorge, and watch BASE (Building Antenna Span Earth) jumpers parachute from the bridge. As the second-highest bridge in the United States at 876 feet, this makes for a spectacular leap!

neri.jpg

FIND A PARK:

FIND BY LOCATION:

FIND BY CATEGORY:

FIND BY THEME:

BROWSE ALPHABETICALLY:

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Nairi Aslanyan

November 10, 2011

a wonderful river! so beautiful and i hope you will continue taking care of it. i think also that rafting companie must be mandated to clean the river quarterly. Cheers

Post a Comment

Share your park story today. Post your park experiences, recommendations, or tips here.*

Nickname
Comment
Email
   
Enter this word:

* Your comments will appear once approved by the moderator. NPCA staff do not regularly respond to postings. We reserve the right to remove comments that include profanity or personal attacks, promote products or services, or are otherwise off-topic. Opinions expressed here do not necessarily reflect the position(s) of NPCA. By submitting comments you are giving NPCA permission to reuse your words on our website and print materials.

Close

Want to learn more about the  ?

The   can be seen in the wild in America’s national parks. Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect parks in   & other states

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect   and other National Parks

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Please leave this field empty
Yes, please sign me up for NPCA’s newsletter and other emails about protecting our national parks!

National Parks Conservation Association
National Parks Conservation Association

Log In

Or log in with your connected Facebook or Twitter account:

GO

Welcome to our growing community of park advocates. Thanks for signing up!

Sign Up:

Or sign up by connecting your Facebook or Twitter account:

GO