Mammoth Cave National Park

With over 350 miles of passageways, Mammoth Cave is the longest known cave system in the world. No other cave even comes close. And explorers aren't even done mapping it yet! The cave system features five separate levels of subterranean rooms, narrow passageways, deep shafts, and underground rivers, all some 400-feet underground. While many visitors come to explore the depths of the cave, Mammoth Cave National Park also protects more than 52,000 acres of land, including rolling hills, sinkholes, and the Green River Valley. Outside the cave, visitors enjoy views from ridge tops covered with oak and hickory forests, deep valleys, and scenic bluffs. The park is home to a variety of animals including eastern white-tailed deer, bobcats and great blue herons. With more than 200 different bird species, birders may well be able to add a few dozen new species to their life list.

The natural wonders of the park are quite diverse, but they can be overshadowed by polluted air. According to NPCA's research, Mammoth Cave National Park is one of the five most polluted parks in the park system. The haziest days in Mammoth Cave are worse than those in any other national park or wilderness area and often match that of urban areas. The park is downwind of large, coal-fired power plants that produce much of the sulfur pollution responsible for hazy skies. NPCA is fighting on both the national and local levels to clear the air in our parks to ensure the long-term health of the parks and their visitors.

If You Go

Mammoth Cave National Park is located in central Kentucky, about 35 miles northeast of Bowling Green, Kentucky, and about 90 miles southwest of Louisville. Make reservations for the cave tours before you go, especially between the months of April and October. Tours of the caves are popular and fill up quickly.

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Threats

Air pollution is among the most serious threats to national parks. The National Park Service has established the NPS air quality webcam network to show “live” digital images of more than a dozen parks. Click here to see current air conditions at Mammoth Cave National Park.

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WHAT DO YOU THINK?

tsynn

January 29, 2014

I totally loved it i would definitely go back. Fat mans misery was the best because i'm small and just walked right through

will the cave dweller

November 14, 2013

i had fun at that cave.i dwelled in the cave for 2 days!wish i could go there more.

cave dweller

November 11, 2013

i dwell in that cave

minecraft legend

November 11, 2013

the caves remind of minecraft caves.

ard79

October 20, 2013

Because I live here I have been many times. Went today for the first time in a long time for a cave tour and took my 5yr son. Can't wait for many more trips with him!!

carlos

September 7, 2013

It was also our fist time visiting the caves and my wife, her friends and I were delighted to see this wonder. I am encouraging friends and neighbors to visit this park. I did not like the food that the park restaurant offers, but they can improve it.

Jennifer

August 9, 2013

funny - under warning for air quality - yet the hotel / cabins there allow smoking! and i'm a smoker, so not complaining - just found it ironic after reading this.

cincymom

July 31, 2013

My family and i just returned from touring the caves and ziplining for the first time. It was a very memorable experience for us. We enjoyed every minute of it. A must see! the pictures do not do it justice.

mr.ed

April 3, 2013

it,s another world. love the feeling of this park.

im cool

February 19, 2013

ive been there and it is awswome

im awsome

February 18, 2013

never been there but the pictures are awsome

t******s*******

February 15, 2013

I love this place lives there for years

g;k;g'lg

December 6, 2012

i think this is amazing

greentom

November 10, 2012

I dont think you should worry about the air pollution. Water pollution causes many more problems. Do you want power? Do you like to have the lights on and go on you computer... People are entitled to power thus power plant COAL is important. I am against this website as a whole. Mammoth Cave in an amazing cave system more internecine than any other in the world..

rons

October 11, 2012

We just go back from a great experience. Our guide was very sensitive to the issue of slavery and my wife and I commented on the different implication of our guide referring to "people (who were enslaved)" versus "slaves." As to the comment about in-cave dining and restrooms, I agree these are a sort of commercializaton that felt wrong, but since they date to a time when this was acceptable, I can't hold it against NPS. Removing the restrooms doesn't really restore things to their original condition and retaining them keeps the experience open to those who have some physical or health limitations. Also, the caves are so vast and so many tours are offered that it is easy to separate yourself this part of the cave.

Just Back

August 19, 2012

I went on the historic cave tour 11:45am 8.17.12, commercialized is correct! I really didn't like how our tour guide attempted to make light of one of the most horrific tragedies in American history, by offering the "positive" side of slavery as if there is such a thing. Please consider changing the tone of the speech.

jennys

May 25, 2012

I really enjoyed the cave tour! However, my family and I thought it was very commercialized. I mean there were bathrooms put in the caves for our conveinance. That is not the natural setting of the cave, which really upset my family and I. Also, there was a place to buy food?? Tell me how that naturally formed. Our tour guide told us not to touch anything, but yet there are bathrooms and places to buy food? Doesn't make sense to me.

hickey110

January 30, 2012

mammoths are awesome

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