Jimmy Carter National Historic Site

 On Vilakazi Street in Johannesburg, South Africa, you can visit the homes of a former president, Nelson Mandela, and a Nobel Prize winner, Desmond Tutu.

In Plains, Georgia, the president and Nobel Prize winner lived on the same farm.

Jimmy Carter’s home is not open to the public, but Jimmy Carter National Historic Site offers insight into this humble, hard-working man whose life has been dedicated to the causes of freedom and human rights.

Start at the visitor center at Plains High School. The classrooms and principal’s office have been restored to their condition in the early 1940s, when both Jimmy and his future wife, Rosalynn, were students. Exhibits throughout the school trace their lives and accomplishments before and after their years in the White House.

The Boyhood Farm where Jimmy Carter spent most of his youth has been restored to its condition pre-1938, when the farm didn’t even have electricity. Interactive outdoor exhibits include Carter’s recorded stories about life on the farm.

At the Plains Train Depot, you’ll be transported back to 1976, when the depot served as headquarters for Jimmy Carter’s presidential campaign. From the depot, you can walk around the Historic District of Plains, in the footsteps of the city’s most important citizen.

Did You Know: 

Former First Lady Rosalynn Carter was valedictorian of the Plains High School graduating class of 1944.

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