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Help us reach our $401,000 goal by 12/31 so we can start 2015 strong defending them.

The national parks are yours.

Make your year-end, tax-deductible contribution to protect them today!

YOU can help protect your national parks!

Help us reach our $401,000 goal by 12/31 so we can start 2015 strong defending them.

The national parks are yours.

Make your year-end, tax-deductible contribution to protect them today!

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Photo: National Park Service

George Rogers Clark National Historical Park

"Great things have been effected by a few men well conducted."  -- George Rogers Clark

When the army led by Col. George Rogers Clark captured the British fort at Vincennes on February 25, 1779, the size of the United States essentially doubled. Clark’s victory opened the vast Northwest Territories, comprising nearly as much land as the original 13 colonies, to American settlement.

George Rogers Clark National Historical Park centers on the massive Clark Memorial, a neoclassical granite rotunda with 16 Doric columns circling a bronze sculpture of the colonel leaning on his sword. Seven monumental murals inside the memorial chart the American settlement of the Ohio Valley and Clark’s battle to wrest the Northwest Territories from British control.

Long Knives, a film about Clark’s campaign, plays every half hour in the visitor center. An audio guide provides narration of the memorial and the murals.

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