Franklin Delano Roosevelt National Memorial

The Franklin Delano Roosevelt National Memorial honors America’s 32nd president and his leadership during some of the most challenging periods in the country’s history.

Located on the Potomac River Tidal Basin, ringed by its famous cherry trees, the FDR monument is part of the National Mall and Memorial Parks. Honoring the spirit of a man who was paralyzed by polio, the memorial is wheelchair accessible, and it offers additional features designed specifically for people with hearing and sight impairments.

This massive memorial is divided into four parts, each representing one of FDR’s terms in office. The memorial is open air, and can be accessed from either end and mid-points along the Tidal Basin, but it is best experienced chronologically.

Towering red granite walls define the four galleries, and turn the massive space into an intimate exploration of the man and his time.  Bronze statues, sculptures, and quotations from FDR’s speeches inscribed on the walls revisit the president’s inauguration, the New Deal, the Great Depression, America’s entry into World War II, and FDR’s legacy.

Waterfalls cascading over rocks create a cool spray that makes this memorial a welcome sanctuary during the hot Washington summers.

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WHAT DO YOU THINK?

pumkinseed22

November 20, 2011

Very good cite to visit if you are in D.C!One of my favorites there!

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