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YOU can help protect your national parks!

Help us reach our $401,000 goal by 12/31 so we can start 2015 strong defending them.

The national parks are yours.

Make your year-end, tax-deductible contribution to protect them today!

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Photo: National Park Service

Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site

“I am an idealist. I don't know where I'm going, but I'm on my way.” Carl Sandburg (1878-1967)

An author, songwriter, and poet, Carl Sandburg wrote about the hopes, dreams, struggles, and triumphs of everyday Americans. He won two Pulitzer Prizes, one for a biography of Abraham Lincoln and the other for a collection of his poems.

The son of Swedish immigrants, he spent his life exploring and defining what it means to be a citizen of this country. He revered the working class, which he considered to be the backbone of the nation. His works include Always the Young Strangers, an autobiography; Remembrance Rock, a novel; and several books of poetry.

A native of Illinois, Sandburg spent most of his life in and around Chicago, the city that inspired his most famous poem, Fog:

 The fog comes in
 on little cat feet.

 It sits looking
 over harbor and city
 on silent haunches
 and then moves on.

Sandburg moved to North Carolina in 1945 at the request of his wife. Their home, named Connemara by a previous owner, sits on 264 lush acres planted with gardens, criss-crossed by five miles of trails, and still inhabited by three breeds of goats favored by Mrs. Sandburg’s.

Visit Connemara to learn more about Sandburg’s writing and to drink in the quietude of western North Carolina. Walk around Front Lake, to the top of Big and Little Glassy Mountains, and through a forest of oak and hickory. Along the way, look for more than 100 species of birds that frequent the park.

Amid the peaceful beauty of Connemara, it’s easy to ignore Sandburg’s warning to a friend, “If one is not careful, one allows diversions to take up one’s time – the stuff of life."

If You Go: 

Tour the interior of Sandburg’s home, which contains thousands of artifacts of the writer’s life.

Did You Know: 

Mrs. Sandburg bred three different types of goats. Park rangers continue her tradition today in the goat dairy farm at the Carl Sandburg Home.

spectacular during the fall leaf season.

carl.jpg

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WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Tools41

September 9, 2014

We bring our special needs student to Sandburg after a trip to pick apples each year. While they don't really understand who Mr. Sandburg is, we emphasize that he liked to write. Writing is way to express yourself and your feelings in a productive way. We also love the goats. They all pick their favorite and we take photos for their scrapbooks.

Betty

September 29, 2013

At the entrance, the guest center posted a notice stating anyone needing assitance, please call code number. A telephone is available with direct line for that purpose. A van will be dispatched and should arrive at the vistors center within five mintues. i am sorry you and your parents missed the tour.

Robin Knupp

September 10, 2013

If there is a sign about what to do if you are handicapped in the parking lot, I missed it. I brought my parents to visit and they can't walk that hill. We left. They at least know who Sandburg was, unlike most people these days.

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