NPCA Reports

Economic Engine: An Analysis of the Potential Impact of a Pullman National Historical Park
November 2013

NPCA, the City of Chicago, and Chicago Neighborhood Initiatives have released a study analyzing the projected economic impact of naming Pullman a national park.

Master Leasing Plans: A Responsible Process
January 2014

The encroachment of energy development on lands near national parks in the West has the potential to cause conflicts between extraction, recreation and conservation. This report encourages a wider embrace of Master Leasing Plans (MLPs) in the West and details several national parks that would benefit from MLPs being conducted nearby.

National Parks and Hydraulic Fracturing
April 2013

Hydraulic fracturing (or “fracking”) is a relatively new extraction method that is now responsible for 90 percent of domestic oil and gas production, with thousands of wells peppering the countryside. The number of wells is expected to skyrocket during the next two decades. The Energy Information Administration estimates that the United States has 2,119 trillion cubic feet of natural gas and 25.2 billion barrels of crude oil recoverable through fracking. What will history say about this innovation? What will the impacts be on America’s public lands—especially our cherished national parks?

Preservation Maintenance in the National Parks
October 2012

For years, the National Park Service has not received the funding it needs to maintain America’s iconic historic buildings, monuments, roads, and other structures in its care. The maintenance backlog for historic structures in the National Park System―the amount of work needed to restore these resources to good condition―is estimated at about $3 billion. While it is critical that Congress and the President meet their obligation to provide funding to maintain and interpret historic structures, there are also alternative strategies that parks can employ to help care for these irreplaceable resources. The Center for Park Research produced this guide for park and preservation advocates to use in sharing information about these alternatives, advocating for their consideration in park planning processes, and building community support for them as a means to preserve and interpret historic structures that often have a strong connection to local communities.

A Sound Investment
October 2012

This report highlights the successful and critical role that the National Park Service plays in restoring the Great Lakes, safeguarding public health, creating jobs, and protecting these special places belonging to all Americans.

Solar Energy, National Parks, and Landscape Protection in the Desert Southwest
September 2012

In this report, NPCA’s Center for Park Research and the California Desert Field Office document the recent rise in solar technology and development; identify areas in the American Southwest that are currently being targeted for industrial-scale solar developments; and examine the effects such developments would have on desert resources, particularly within national parks in the region. The Center and California Desert Field Office also suggest solutions for minimizing harm to fragile desert resources while encouraging appropriate siting of solar energy developments on public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management.

Pathways to Prosperity
July 2012

“Pathways to Prosperity” chronicles the experiences of business owners and economic developers, asking the simple question, “Why do you choose to live and work in the Crown?” The answer – lakes, mountains, wildlife – is universal. And once we recognize what we value about a place – what makes it special – we can work to protect it.

Avoiding a Risky Gamble with America’s National Parks
April 2012

The National Parks Conservation Association recently released a report, “Avoiding a Risky Gamble with America’s National Parks,” outlining in disturbing detail the economic and environmental risks of allocating up to 2.5 million acres of public lands in Utah, Wyoming, and Colorado for commercial leases for oil shale and tar sands development, which is currently being considered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Wilderness Battlefield Update
April 2012

On Friday, April 13th, NPCA and fellow members of the Wilderness Battlefield Coalition released the Wilderness Battlefield Gateway Study that demonstrates how protection of our sacred places and economic growth can coexist is a planned complimentary manner.

Cleaning up the Haze: Protecting People and America’s Treasured Places
January 2012

Cleaning up the Haze: Protecting People and America’s Treasured Places asks EPA to drop its proposed BART rule exemption so that our country’s most iconic natural places are fully protected from unsightly and unhealthy air.

Opportunity Knocks
January 2012

In December 2011, the National Parks Conservation Association, Houston Wilderness and Rice University’s SSPEED Center commissioned Harbinger Consulting Group to conduct a study to evaluate the potential economic impacts of the proposed Lone Star Coastal National Recreation Area in Brazoria, Chambers, Galveston and Matagorda counties along the upper Texas Gulf Coast.

Protecting Our Chesapeake, Protecting Our National Parks
November 2011

“Protecting Our Chesapeake, Protecting Our National Parks” explores two historical parks in the Chesapeake watershed, Colonial National Historical Park on the James and York rivers and Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine on the Patapsco River. It recounts what the rivers looked like before significant agricultural practices, oyster harvesting, and extensive human development. It recommends options to restore the Chesapeake Bay and their national parks to a highly productive ecosystem with cleaner water, fewer toxic contaminants, and more abundant aquatic and terrestrial life. Our national parks help us recognize what has been lost and so help us see what we have the opportunity to regain.

Made in America
November 2011

America’s national parks drive local economies, provide quality jobs and affordable family vacations, and protect irreplaceable resources, all for a tiny fraction of our federal budget. But now our nation’s greatest places face significant long-term funding cuts which could mean trouble for many iconic parks—as well as the rangers, visitors, and wildlife who enjoy them.

The State of America's National Parks
June 2011

This report provides the most comprehensive overview ever conducted on resource conditions in America’s national parks. A decade in the making, The State of America’s National Parks analyzes 80 national parks across the country to gauge how America’s most precious places are faring in the face of pollution, invasive species, climate change, energy development, adjacent land development, and chronic funding shortfalls.

San Antonio Missions National Historical Park: Impact and Opportunity
May 2011

The National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA) commissioned a study—conducted by the Center for Community and Business Research at the University of Texas at San Antonio—to comprehensively examine the economic impact of San Antonio Missions National Historical Park and ensure the adequate preservation, protection and interpretation of our nation’s largest collection of Spanish colonial resources. The study was funded with assistance from Bexar County, Los Compadres de San Antonio Missions National Historical Park, and Western National Parks Association. Using an input-output model, the economic assessment found that San Antonio’s historic missions provide a tremendous economic impact for surrounding communities.

National Parks of the Colorado River Basin
April 2011

This report by NPCA’s Center for Park Research identifies the effects that large dams have on natural and cultural resources in Dinosaur National Monument, Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park, Canyonlands National Park, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, and Grand Canyon National Park. The report also considers the economic value of national parks as well as the economic value of hydropower generated by large dams in the Colorado River Basin.



Report Archive

Making Connections: Colonial National Historical Park Enhances Economic Vitality in Virginia’s Historic Triangle
September 2011
The third in our series, this Making Connections report demonstrates the pivotal role Colonial National Historical Park plays to enhance the economic base of the Historic Triangle in Virginia (Jamestown, Yorktown and Williamsburg).

The Future of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore
September 2011
After more than two years of research and listening to people who love Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, NPCA, The Field Museum of Chicago, and the Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands is pleased to make The Future of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore available. (PDF/4.6 MB)

Lower New River State of the Watershed
July 2011
After listening to feedback from community members, wastewater managers, business owners, conservation leaders, agency representatives, and others, the New River Clean Water Alliance is pleased to make the final Lower New River State of the Watershed report available to you.

The State of America’s National Parks
A Center for Park Research Report
June 2011
This report is the culmination of ten years of research on the condition of natural and cultural resources within America’s national parks. The data for this report were gleaned from the Center’s research on 80 national parks.

National Parks of the Colorado River Basin: Water Management, Resource Threats, and Economics
A Center for Park Research Report
April 2011
This report by NPCA’s Center for Park Research identifies the effects that large dams have on natural and cultural resources in Dinosaur National Monument, Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park, Canyonlands National Park, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, and Grand Canyon National Park. The report also considers the economicvalue of national parks as well as the economic value of hydropower generated by large dams in the Colorado River Basin.

Muir Woods National Monument
A State of the Parks® Report
January 2011
NPCA’s Center for State of the Parks recently completed a review of Muir Woods National Monument’s cultural and natural resources. This assessment determined that natural resources are in “good” condition overall, while cultural resources are in “fair” condition.

Linking Outdoor Recreation, Open Space & History at Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park and Nearby Communities
November 2010
This Making Connections report offers insights into the links between open space, outdoor recreation, and history at Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park and nearby communities.

Grand Canyon National Park
A State of the Parks® Report
August 2010
NPCA’s new Center for State of the Parks report finds that external threats and funding shortfalls at the Grand Canyon are creating significant problems that if not addressed will complicate and compromise resource protection and management.

Alcatraz Island
A State of the Parks® Report
August 2010
NPCA's Center for State of the Parks report looks at the challenges the Park Service faces in caring for Alcatraz Island’s cultural and natural resources, as well as the work being done to protect those resources into the future.

South Carolina’s Revolutionary War National Parks
June 2010
NPCA’s Center for State of the Parks released assessments of three South Carolina Revolutionary War parks—Kings Mountain National Military Park, Cowpens National Battlefield, and Ninety Six National Historic Site. The reports find that additional funding is needed to maintain these historic sites that bring American history to life and offer a wealth of family-friendly educational and recreational opportunities year-round.

Appalachian National Scenic Trail: A Special Report
March 2010
NPCA’s Center for State of the Parks report explores cultural and natural resources along the trail, as well as threats to those resources and the visitor experiences the trail provides.

Re•store•á•Nation: The Economic Benefits of Restoring the Lands and Waters of our National Parks
March 2010
This report highlights the need for continuing investments in restoration projects to sustain economies, maintain healthy ecosystems, address climate change, and create American jobs.

Making Connections: Building a healthy future for Shenandoah National Park and its gateway communities
January 2010
This Making Connections report surveys important aspects of the interdependence between Shenandoah National Park and its neighbors, and offers insight into Shenandoah’s positive economic influence on surrounding communities.

Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site
A State of the Parks® Report

December 2009
NPCA's Center for State of the Parks recently completed a review of Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site’s cultural and natural resources. This assessment determined that cultural resources are in "fair" condition overall; natural resource conditions were not rated due to a lack of information.

Lassen Volcanic National Park
A State of the Parks® Report

November 2009
NPCA's Center for State of the Parks recently completed a review of Lassen Volcanic National Park’s natural and cultural resources and determined that they are in "fair" condition. Challenges facing the Park Service include previous human activities—fire suppression policies, construction of roads, and the drainage of wetlands—that have degraded important habitat in the park.

Effigy Mounds National Monument
A State of the Parks® Report

August 2009
According to an assessment by NPCA’s Center for State of the Parks, the cultural and natural resources protected within Effigy Mounds National Monument are in “fair” condition overall.

Climate Change and National Park Wildlife: A Survival Guide for a Warming World
August 2009
Wildlife and public lands need help surviving the conditions caused by climate change, such as droughts, warmer temperatures, and loss of habitat. A new report by the National Parks Conservation Association recommends strategies to help wildlife adapt, including providing land corridors and reducing stress from pollution and invasive species.

Scotts Bluff National Monument
A State of the Parks® Report

August 2009
According to this assessment by NPCA’s Center for State of the Parks, the cultural and natural resources protected within Scotts Bluff National Monument are in “fair” condition, overall (cultural resources achieved a score of 67 out of 100; natural resources achieved a score of 70 out of 100). The monument faces challenges protecting what remains of the Oregon Trail “swale” (the deep roadbed that was created by pioneers’ wagons); a lack of funds to care for 1930s structures built by the Civilian Conservation Corps; missing or outdated planning and management documents; an overall lack of staffing; and a growing maintenance backlog.

Lake Clark National Park and Preserve
A State of the Parks® Report

July 2009
According to an assessment by the Center for State of the Parks, Lake Clark National Park & Preserve’s ecosystem is in excellent condition, receiving one of the highest scores among parks assessed throughout the nation, largely because of the park’s remoteness, lack of major road systems, and distance from sources of pollution. Yet NPCA cautions that a future mining district being explored across 1,000 square miles adjacent to Lake Clark National Park & Preserve is the single greatest threat to the integrity of the park’s resources, including the region’s abundant fish and wildlife and the rural lifestyles enjoyed by local subsistence users and community based commercial fishermen.

Civil War National Parks: The Battles for Missouri
A State of the Parks® Report

June 2009
According to an assessment by the Center for State of the Parks, cultural resources at both Wilson’s Creek and Pea Ridge are in “fair” condition. Natural resource conditions also received “fair” scores at both of the parks.

Landscapes of Opportunity
The Economic Influence of National Parks in Southeast Utah

May 2009
This report profiles local community and business leaders and examines economic data to illustrate the complex, symbiotic relationship between the national parklands in Southeast Utah and their neighbors, and the advantages for each in continuing the region's deliberate approach to planning and compatible development.

Tennessee's Civil War National Parks
A State of the Parks® Report

May 2009
According to an assessment by the Center for State of the Parks, cultural resources at Fort Donelson, Shiloh, and Chickamauga and Chattanooga are in “fair” condition, while cultural resources at Stones River are in “good” condition. The parks face several common challenges. Primary among them are funding shortfalls that limit the Park Service’s ability to preserve historic sites and tell the stories of our American heritage. Also of critical concern at all four parks is adjacent development that mars historical and scenic views that are essential to interpreting American history and providing visitors with a memorable experience.

Cumberland Island National Seashore
A State of the Parks® Report

April 2009
According to an assessment by NPCA’s Center for State of the Parks, current overall conditions of Cumberland Island’s known cultural resources rated a “poor” score of 55 out of 100. Challenges to the park’s cultural resources include unfunded staff positions, lack of planning and management documents, and difficulty maintaining numerous historic structures with limited funding.

Great Basin National Park
A State of the Parks® Report

March 2009
According to this assessment by the Center for State of the Parks, natural resources at the park are in “good” condition, with a score of 81 out of 100. The park currently has “good” air quality and “excellent” water quality, but they are threatened by power plants and groundwater withdrawals, respectively, and past grazing practices and fire suppression have degraded park habitats. Staff are working to restore some areas.

Protect the Air We Breathe: An Agenda for Clean Air
February 2009
NPCA, The American Lung Association, and other organizations have developed a Clean Air Agenda for the new administration and congress. The Agenda calls on our elected leaders to clean up coal plant pollution and take other steps necessary to protect public health and restore healthy parks and wild lands.

Harpers Ferry National Historical Park
A State of the Parks® Report

February 2009
According to an assessment by the Center for State of the Parks, cultural resources at the park are in “good” condition, although the park needs adequate on-site museum collection storage space, archaeological surveys, cultural landscape documentation, and historic resource studies. The park also faces an overall lack of funding and staff to care for cultural resources.

Working Assets: Reinvesting in National Parks to Create Jobs and Protect America's Heritage
January 2009

Reinvesting now in the infrastructure of our national parks, as was done in the 1930s, creates jobs and economic activity when we need it, and restores our national parks for our children and grandchildren to enjoy. NPCA's report cites more than $2.5 billion worth of ready-to-go, job-creating projects in national parks nationwide.

Redwood National and State Parks
A State of the Parks® Report

December 2008
According to an assessment by NPCA’s Center for State of the Parks, current overall conditions of Redwood’s known natural resources rated a “fair” score of 69 out of 100. Park staff continue to work to correct past ecosystem damage that resulted from unsustainable logging practices and incompatible upstream development.

Appomattox Court House National Historical Park
A State of the Parks® Report

November 2008
According to an assessment by NPCA’s Center for State of the Parks, current overall conditions of Appomattox Court House’s known cultural resources rated a “fair” score of 68 out of 100.Challenges to the park’s cultural resources include a lack of planning documents, unfunded staff positions, and limited exhibit and storage space.

Texas Pride: Celebrating and Protecting Our National Parks in the Lone Star State
November 2008
Texas Pride provides a quick tour of the 13 national park sites in Texas, and inspiration for each of us to help protect our heritage for our children and grandchildren.

Vicksburg National Military Park
A State of the Parks® Report
October 2008
According to an assessment by NPCA’s Center for State of the Parks, current overall conditions of Vicksburg’s known cultural resources rated a score of 67 out of 100, indicating “fair” conditions.Current federal funding and staffing levels are insufficient to adequately care for the park’s historic structures, cultural landscapes, archaeology sites, and extensive museum collection.

Andrew Johnson National Historic Site
A State of the Parks® Report
October 2008
According to a recent assessment by the Center for State of the Parks, cultural resources at Andrew Johnson National Historic Site are currently in good condition overall. Even so, park staff are concerned that they will be unable to maintain them in this condition without additional funds and staff.

Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve
A State of the Parks® Report
September 2008
According to an assessment by NPCA’s Center for State of the Parks, current overall conditions of Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve’s known natural resources rated a “good” score of 89 out of 100. The park is comprised of largely untouched wilderness that is relatively pristine compared to other national parks.

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
A State of the Parks® Report
July 2008
According to an assessment by NPCA’s Center for State of the Parks, current overall conditions of Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park’s known natural resources rated a "poor" score of 60 out of 100.

Dark Horizons: 10 National Parks Most Threatened by New Coal-Fired Power Plants
May 2008
Americans expect and deserve clean air when they visit our national parks! NPCA's new report highlights the ten national parks most threatened by new coal-fired power plants, and calls on the Administration to abandon its effort to permit more harmful air pollution near national parks.

America's Heritage For Sale
April 2008
To protect our national heritage, NPCA is calling on Congress and the next Administration to provide the funding needed to acquire the critical, 1.8 million acres of private land within the boundaries of our national parks, or risk losing it to development.

Southern California's Mediterranean Biome Parks
A State of the Parks® Report
April 2008
Center for State of the Parks® researchers used established, peer-reviewed methodologies to systemically rate conditions of both natural and cultural resources at Channel Islands National Park, Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, and Cabrillo National Monument. Southern California's Mediterranean Biome Parks: A Resource Assessment describes these sites and their significance, and summarizes resource conditions.

San Antonio Missions National Historical Park
A State of the Parks® Report
March 2008
Recognizing San Antonio Missions National Historical Park's significance to our shared national heritage, NPCA's Center for State of the Parks endeavored to determine the conditions of the cultural resources protected within the park.

Virgin Islands National Park
A State of the Parks® Report
March 2008
This report by NPCA's Center for State of the Parks describes Virgin Islands National Park's and Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument's diverse natural and cultural resources, summarizes current conditions of those resources, illuminates resource threats, and describes some of the ways resource managers are working to improve resource conditions.

San Juan Island National Historical Park
A State of the Parks® Report
November 2007
According to an assessment by NPCA’s Center for State of the Parks, current overall conditions of San Juan Island National Historical Park's known cultural resources rated a "fair" score of 67 out of 100. Funds are needed to support maintenance and rehabilitation of historic structures as well as archaeological work. Natural resources received a "fair" score of 72 out of 100. Non-native rabbits and invasive plants are invading the park’s prairie.

Fort Pulaski National Monument
A State of the Parks® Report
November 2007
According to NPCA's Center for State of the Parks assessment, current overall conditions of Fort Pulaski National Monument's known cultural resources rated "fair" with a score of 69 out of 100. The park lacks enough space to store its museum collection, and more research is needed on historic structures and historical topics.

National Parks of the Great Lakes
A State of the Parks® Report
October 2007
Recognizing the significance of the Great Lakes, the Center for State of the Parks endeavored to determine the conditions of natural and cultural resources at six parks along the lakes.

Assateague Island National Seashore
A State of the Parks® Report

August 2007
According to NPCA's Center for State of the Parks assessment, Assateague's natural resources rank in "fair" condition, scoring an overall 75 out of 100 points. The assessment also finds that Assateague's cultural resources are in "poor" condition, scoring an overall 58 out of 100.

Unnatural Disaster: Global Warming and Our National Parks
July 2007
Although the situation seems dire, NPCA's report says we can still halt the most severe effects of climate change if we take action now.

Gateway National Recreation Area
A State of the Parks® Report

May 2007
Current overall conditions of Gateway's known cultural and natural resources rated "poor" scores of 46 and 53, respectively. This report contains descriptions of park resources and summaries of resource conditions.

Big Hole National Battlefield
A State of the Parks® Report

January 2007
Current overall conditions of Big Hole National Battlefield’s known cultural and natural resources rated “fair” scores of 70 and 74, respectively. This report contains descriptions of park resources and summaries of resource conditions.

U.S. National Park System: An Economic Asset at Risk
December 2006
According to a new economic analysis released by the National Parks Conservation Association, America's National Park System generates more than four dollars in value to the public for every tax dollar invested by the Federal Government.

5 Ways America Can Fix Our National Parks
October 2006
America's national parks are in crisis—underfunding, traffic congestion, and pollution are all taking their toll. This report details NPCA's plan for how to fix the parks before their 100th birthday.

National Parks Along the Lewis and Clark Trail
A State of the Parks® Report
September 2006
During the bicentennial year of the conclusion of Lewis and Clark’s journey, the Center for State of the Parks endeavored to determine the conditions of cultural and natural resources at six national parks that are associated with the Lewis and Clark Expedition.

Turning Point
August 2006
NPCA's report reveals air pollution is a system-wide challenge for the national parks with one in three parks--more than 150 of the 390 national park units in the National Park System--located in parts of the country where air pollution exceeds federal standards.

Who's Counting (PDF)
August 2006
NPCA's Who's Counting? report examines the data available to the National Park Service in considering the management of wildlife populations.

Gateways to Yellowstone
May 2006
In 2005, through its offices in Helena and Livingston, Montana, the National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA) commissioned four studies to explore the roots of the Yellowstone region's tremendous economic success.

Catoctin Mountain Park
A State of the Parks® Report

March 2006
Located about 60 miles from both Baltimore and Washington, D.C., Catoctin Mountain Park is home to more than 1,000 native plant and animal species. The condition of the park’s natural resources scored the highest of nearly all parks assessed by NPCA’s Center for State of the Parks thus far.

Biscayne National Park
A State of the Parks® Report

February 2006
NPCA’s State of the Parks assessment rates the park’s natural and cultural resources in poor condition, and in need of immediate attention.

Florida Bay
A State of the Parks® Report

December 2005
NPCA's State of the Parks assessment reveals that Florida Bay's resources are challenged by continued human interference.

Longfellow National Historic Site
A State of the Parks® Report

August 2005
NPCA is concerned that the parks funding shortfall undermines progress made to restore and preserve the site over the past few years.

Zion National Park
A State of the Parks® Report
July 2005
NPCA’s assessment of Zion National Park, one of the earliest additions to the National Park System, reveals that interpretive staff number one to every 105,000 visitors--a shortage which limits meaningful visitor experiences.

Big Thicket
A State of the Parks® Report

July 2005
At Big Thicket National Preserve, archaeological resources, logging mills, oil wells, and homesteads tell the stories of 8,000 years of human history. NPCA's assessment reveals that these resources are threatened by development as well as potentially damaging proposals to construct Fastrill Reservoir and Rockland Dam on the Neches River.

Bryce Canyon
A State of the Parks® Report

June 2005
Today, Bryce Canyon natural resources are in "good" condition. Air quality in the park is generally excellent; scenic vistas can stretch for up to 200 miles. Overall condition of Bryce Canyon's cultural resources is another matter.

California Desert State of the Parks Report
June 2005
NPCA’s comprehensive assessment of the health of Joshua Tree and Death Valley national parks and Mojave National Preserve in the California desert reveals disconcerting threats to park air and water quality from development, and insufficient funding, which is affecting the condition of cultural artifacts, historic sites, and other treasures.

FADED GLORY: Top Ten Reasons to Reinvest in Our National Park Heritage
March 2005
The Park Service’s budget is insufficient to address myriad needs including poaching and drug smuggling, invasive plants and animals, shoddy roads and trails, and cutbacks in educational programs for school groups and park visitors.

Making the Grade
January 2005
Educational Opportunities and Challenges in California's National Parks.

Hopewell Furnace
A State of the Parks® Report

October 2004
Cumulative funding constraints have forced this southeastern Pennsylvania park to severely limit its living history programs, reducing its ability to educate visitors.

Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site
A State of the Parks® Report

September 2004
The home, studios, and gardens of Augustus Saint-Gaudens, one of America's foremost sculptors, won't win critical praise.

Canyonlands National Park
A State of the Parks® Report

September 2004
On Canyonlands' 40th birthday, report reveals midlife crisis.

Fort Laramie National Historic Site
A State of the Parks® Report

July 2004
Although its legacy continues to play a pivotal role in the lives of Plains Indians, Fort Laramie National Historic Site in Wyoming does not yet adequately interpret this history for visitors.

Fort Necessity National Battlefield
A State of the Parks® Report

June 2004
Fort Necessity is under siege again. A critical shortfall in funding could cost this park the battle to preserve our national heritage.

Olympic National Park
A State of the Parks® Report

May 2004
Olympic gets a silver medal for park health, but could be disqualified for inadequate funding.

Andersonville National Historic Park
A State of the Parks® Report

May 2004
Known as Camp Sumter during the American Civil War, Andersonville held captive more than 45,000 prisoners of war and was one of the largest and most notorious Confederate military prisons. Today this park is suffering from a serious budget shortfall.

The Burgeoning Backlog
May 2004
Decades of insufficient funding in the national parks—a situation that has caused a growing backlog of deferred maintenance projects, is now estimated by the General Accounting Office at $4 billion to $6.8 billion.

C&O Canal National Historical Park
A State of the Parks® Report

April 2004
On the 50th anniversary celebration of a Supreme Court justice's hike to save the C&O Canal from being covered in asphalt, this report reveals that the canal's future is again in question -- this time by an annual funding shortfall in excess of $13 million, development, and other threats.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park
A State of the Parks® Report

April 2004
The most popular park in the national park system faces a critical shortage of funding and is plagued by air pollution and invasive species.

Endangered Rangers
April 2004
A study of the severe staffing shortages crippling America's national parks.

Big Bend National Park
A State of the Parks® Report

November 2003
Big Bend may appear pristine, but historical land uses have caused extirpation of several native species, considerable soil erosion, and a general decline in the condition of both natural and cultural resources.

Economic Impact of Visitor Spending in California's National Parks
November 2003
With the establishment of Yellowstone National Park in 1872, America's national parks have protected our most fragile natural and cultural landscapes and provided opportunities for adventure, inspiration, relaxation, and education. The national parks have also served as tremendous economic engines, supporting businesses and jobs in neighboring communities that have come to depend upon the viability of the parks.

Gateway to Glacier
May 2003
In 2002, the National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA)—through its Northern Rockies regional offices located in Whitefish and Helena—commissioned three separate studies to explore the roots of economic vitality in Flathead County, the primary "gateway" to Glacier National Park.

Denali National Park and Preserve
A State of the Parks® Report

July 2003
Denali's remoteness, coupled with strict mandates to protect the park's wildlife habitat and large-scale functioning ecosystems, have helped this special place remain much as it has for millennia. However, concerns about sweeping changes in motorized access, along with degradation by airborne contaminants may soon alter Denali's health.

Little Bighorn National Battlefield
A State of the Parks® Report

June 2003
Over the past 30 years, management and interpretation of the 765-acre Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument has evolved
from a primary emphasis on the "white man's" story to inclusion of all those who were affected by the battle.

Shenandoah National Park
A State of the Parks® Report

June 2003
Beneath its magnificence, Shenandoah is a park in jeopardy. Years of inadequate funding coupled with serious threats to the park's resources are taking a toll. The challenge is to conserve what exists now, and in some cases to restore degraded resources, to ensure that the park remains healthy.

Gateway to Glacier
May 2003
NPCA—through its Northern Rockies regional offices located in Whitefish and Helena—commissioned three studies. These studies explore the roots of economic vitality in Flathead County, the primary gateway to Glacier. From three different angles, the studies help to illuminate important relationships among economic vitality, the natural environment, and the quality of life that is valued by both residents and visitors.

Frederick Douglass National Historic Site
A State of the Parks® Report

February 2003
The famous 19th-century African-American abolitionist and orator Frederick Douglass is celebrated at the national historic site that preserves his Washington, D.C., home. The park lacks sufficient funding to ensure that it remains a fitting tribute to this truly great American. Furthermore, an unresolved moisture problem threatens the house and its treasures. (February 2003)

Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park
A State of the Parks® Report

November, 2002
One of the continent's most valued treasures, Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park contains 1.1 million acres of outstanding scenic values, diverse wildlife, sparkling waters, remarkable historic and cultural heritage, and more. But haphazard development of nearby landscapes and inadequate funding for basic park operations threaten the natural and cultural resources that make the Peace Park so extraordinary.

Rocky Mountain National Park
A State of the Parks® Report

August 2002
Rocky Mountain National Park boasts alpine meadows strewn with multi-colored wildflowers, mountainsides dotted with golden aspen, crystal-clear lakes, fast-flowing mountain streams, and a multitude of wildlife species. The park also contains six historic districts, hundreds of prehistoric archaeological sites, and thousands of artifacts.

Point Reyes National Seashore
A State of the Parks® Report

January 2002
Point Reyes National Seashore's marine and terrestrial ecosystems harbor an astonishingly rich array of wildlife species; some found nowhere else on Earth. A wide-ranging cultural and historical legacy dating back 5,000 years seizes the imagination of visitors.

Adams National Historical Park
A State of the Parks® Report

October 2001
Adams National Historical Park is the only place in the country
where the stories of two presidents can be told from birth to death. Today, we can still sense the presence of these men, their forebears, spouses, and descendants through visits to the Adamses' homes and gardens.

Close

Want to learn more about the  ?

The   can be seen in the wild in America’s national parks. Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect parks in   & other states

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect   and other National Parks

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Please leave this field empty
Yes, please sign me up for NPCA’s newsletter and other emails about protecting our national parks!

National Parks Conservation Association
National Parks Conservation Association

Log In

Or log in with your connected Facebook or Twitter account:

GO

Welcome to our growing community of park advocates. Thanks for signing up!

Sign Up:

Or sign up by connecting your Facebook or Twitter account:

GO