Park Advocates Applaud Legislated Plans to Close Longtime Nevada Polluter, with Reservations about other Provisions

 
PRESS RELEASE
  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date:   June 4, 2013
Contact:   Lynn Davis, Nevada Senior Program Manager, National Parks Conservation Association: 702-281-7380, ldavis@npca.org
Kati Schmidt, Senior Media Relations Manager, National Parks Conservation Association: 415-728-0840, kschmidt@npca.org


Park Advocates Applaud Legislated Plans to Close Longtime Nevada Polluter, with Reservations about other Provisions

Legislation Calls for the Closing of Decades Old Reid Gardner Generating Station by 2017, Promising a Future of Cleaner Air for Region’s National Parks

Statement by Lynn Davis, Nevada Senior Program Manager, National Parks Conservation Association

“Legislation passed yesterday by the Nevada Legislature to shutter the state’s most notorious air polluter is a welcome step in improving the health of the region’s national parks, as well as the lives of the millions of people who live in and visit the area. Since first opening in 1965, the Reid Gardner Generating Station has degraded air quality at many of the region’s natural treasures, including nearby Grand Canyon and Zion National Parks, and even Joshua Tree National Park.  It also impacts the nearby Lake Mead National Recreation Area – the fifth most visited site in our National Park System – and Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument, on the northern boundary of the Grand Canyon.”

“We applaud NV Energy’s own acknowledgement that it’s time to retire the use of coal,  and we look forward to finally shutting down this coal-fired power plant which has impaired visibility in several of America’s national parks and has threatened the health of local residents.  While we reserve judgment on legislative provisions that will weaken the review and oversight of the Nevada Public Utilities Commission, it is unquestionable that closing the Reid Gardner power plant is a win for both the people of this region and for our beloved national parks.” 

“The National Parks Conservation Association has long worked to protect air quality in national parks impacted by antiquated coal-fired power plants.   We support moving away from these pollution creating energy sources and towards energy-efficient measures and appropriately sited renewable energy projects as means of combatting climate change, creating new jobs, and ensuring long-term sustainability.”


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