NPCA Applauds American Rivers Endangered Rivers List for 2013

 
PRESS RELEASE
  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date:   April 17, 2013
Contact:   Jeff Billington, Senior Media Relations Manager, jbillington@npca.org, 202-419-3717
David Nimkin, Southwest Senior Regional Director, dnimkin@npca.org, 801-521-0785


NPCA Applauds American Rivers Endangered Rivers List for 2013

Brings much needed focus to Colorado River concerns

STATEMENT BY: David Nimkin, Southwest Senior Regional Director, National Parks Conservation Association

“NPCA applauds American Rivers  in naming the Colorado River America’s most endangered river in their annual list “America’s Most Endangered Rivers” released today.  In doing so, they bring to the forefront the pressing issues that face this great river basin.

“NPCA believes that when most Americans think about the Colorado River, it is likely in connection to their experience with one of the nine national parks and recreation areas that are truly defined by the river including Arches National Park, Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park, Canyonlands National Park, Curecanti National Recreation Area, Dinosaur National Monument, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Grand Canyon National Park, Lake Mead National Recreation Area, and Rocky Mountain National Park.  These parks and recreation areas depend on the river’s natural and cultural resources for their endurance and allure and in turn create vital economic boons for surrounding communities throughout the basin.

“In their report, American Rivers points to the need for Congress to fund programs which will  encourage better water management of the Colorado River for the 21st century.  NPCA couldn’t agree more.   All concerned agencies, including U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; the Bureau of Land Management; Bureau of Reclamation; and the National Park Service must be involved in the development of a long term, basin-wide framework for adaptive flow management that addresses the needs of surrounding cities, agriculture, hydropower, recreation and environmental resources.

“Full participation and adequate funding are both crucial to the future of this great American waterway.”

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