National Parks Group Applauds Wyoming Air Pollution Clean Up Plan

 
PRESS RELEASE
  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date:   May 29, 2013
Contact:   Stephanie Kodish, Clean Air Counsel, National Parks Conservation Association, 865-964-1774, skodish@npca.org
Jeff Billington, Senior Media Relations Manager, National Parks Conservation Association, 202-419-3717, jbillington@npca.org


National Parks Group Applauds Wyoming Air Pollution Clean Up Plan

STATEMENT BY: Stephanie Kodish, Clean Air Counsel, National Parks Conservation Association
   
“On May 23rd the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a plan to improve national park air quality by compelling the cleanup of outdated Wyoming coal-fired power plants. EPA’s plan will require that PacifiCorp’s Dave Johnston, Naughton, and Jim Bridger facilities and Basin Electric’s Laramie River Station install technologies that will reduce haze-causing nitrogen oxide pollution by approximately 85 percent. The technology to achieve these reductions is in use at more than 400 similar facilities nationwide and is widely accepted as best practice in the industry.

“Lowering these pollutants will dramatically benefit the quality of air, water and other ecological resources at the region’s national parks, which include Yellowstone, Grand Teton, and Rocky Mountain, and improve the health and well-being of visitors and neighboring communities. Annually, these three parks alone receive more than 9 million visitors and generate more than $965 million for local communities.

“The more than 750,000 members and supporters of the National Parks Conservation Association strongly support the improved and long overdue Wyoming air cleanup plan. We applaud the EPA for adhering to the Clean Air Act’s 36-year old mandate to protect and restore the air quality of our country’s treasured public lands. The cleanup of these old and dirty coal-fired power plants will benefit the national parks and wilderness areas for present and future generations.”

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