One of America's Most Visited National Park Sites Threatened by Power Lines

 
PRESS RELEASE
  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date:   October 5, 2011
Contact:   Bryan Faehner, Associate Director for Park Uses, National Parks Conservation Association P: 202.419.3700 C: 202.731.1847
Alison Zemanski, Media Relations Manager, National Parks Conservation Association P: 202.454.3332; C: 202.384.8762


One of America's Most Visited National Park Sites Threatened by Power Lines

Interior Department’s announcement fast-tracks controversial power line proposal through Delaware Water Gap

Statement by NPCA Associate Director for Park Uses Bryan Faehner

“The Obama Administration has failed to protect three popular national park sites in New Jersey and Pennsylvania with today’s decision to include the controversial Susquehanna-Roseland power line project on its list of fast-tracked transmission projects.

“Susquehanna-Roseland proposes to build massive 200-foot towers and power lines across the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, the Middle Delaware National Scenic River, and the Appalachian National Scenic Trail in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Delaware Water Gap alone enjoys more than five million visitors annually – most of which come from nearby urban areas – seeking the park’s inspiring views and outstanding recreational opportunities.

“Building massive power lines across these parks will harm the very resources they were designated to protect. This development can only harm visitors’ experience to the parks and puts economic benefits to local communities at risk. Unlike other proposals mentioned on the Administration’s list, the Susquehanna-Roseland power line proposal would not help bring renewable energy sources on-line. Instead, it would transmit electricity produced by dirty coal-fired power plants.

“In addition, the project is an example of the lack of communication and cooperation among federal agencies. The National Park Service (NPS) was consulted very late in the planning process and now is the last decision point before the line is built. A truly effective coordinated effort by the Administration should require that planning between and among federal agencies occurs early on so that the lands held in trust for all Americans are preserved, and proposals to build power lines through units of our National Park System are averted.

“We insist that the Administration avoids our national parks when siting transmission lines – this will ensure future generations can enjoy America’s national parks as visitors do today."

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