Ed Lewis Joins Board of National Park Group

 
PRESS RELEASE
  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date:   November 29, 2011
Contact:   Perry Wheeler, NPCA Senior Media Relations Coordinator, P: 202-419-3712 or pwheeler@npca.org


Ed Lewis Joins Board of National Park Group

Washington, D.C. – Ed Lewis, conservation consultant and former executive director of the Greater Yellowstone Coalition, has been elected to the Board of Trustees of the National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA). The board is the governing body for the nonprofit park watchdog organization.
 
“Ed has been a leader within the conservation movement in this country for many years,” said NPCA President Tom Kiernan. "He worked tirelessly to protect Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks as Executive Director of the Greater Yellowstone Coalition and has been a valued consultant for dozens of organizations more recently. We're thrilled to have him join our board."
 
Since 1994, Lewis has provided programmatic, organizational and strategic planning consulting to the conservation community and environmental grant makers, including NPCA. Before that, from 1986 to 1984, he served as executive director of the Greater Yellowstone Coalition, where he worked on endangered species protection, ecosystem management and national park preservation. From 1969 to 1986, he was a partner in the Phoenix, Arizona law firm of Lewis and Roca.

While in Arizona, Lewis was active on environmental issues, serving as chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Arizona Nature Conservancy and appointed to the Arizona Commission on the Environment by Governor Babbitt.

Mr. Lewis also serves on the Board of Trustees of Earthjustice (Chair), Training Resources for the Environmental Community (Chair), and LaSalle Adams Fund.
 
Since 1919, the nonpartisan NPCA has been the leading voice of the American people in the fight to safeguard our National Park System. NPCA, its members, and partners work together to protect the park system and preserve our nation's natural, historical, and cultural heritage for generations to come. For more information, visit www.npca.org

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