National Parks Conservation Association Praises Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Decision to Protect Joshua Tree National Park's Wildlife

 
PRESS RELEASE
  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date:   March 10, 2010
Contact:   Michael Cipra: 760.799.5911


National Parks Conservation Association Praises Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Decision to Protect Joshua Tree National Park's Wildlife

Joshua Tree, Calif.--The nation’s leading voice for the national parks, the nonprofit National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA) applauds the decision today by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) to abandon its power line proposal through a major wildlife corridor for Joshua Tree National Park.

“Everyone who cares about Joshua Tree National Park and its world-class wildlife should know that the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power has just made the right choice,” said Mike Cipra, NPCA’s California Desert Program Manager.  “This massive power line would have blocked the path to life-giving springs for animals like desert bighorn sheep.”

 

Located directly west of Joshua Tree National Park lies 31,000 acres of diverse desert habitat known as Big Morongo Canyon Preserve, which has been identified as an Area of Critical Environmental Concern by the Bureau of Land Management. In efforts to secure additional protection for this pristine area, Senator Dianne Feinstein introduced legislation to establish a new “Sand to Snow National Monument” as part of the California Desert Protection Act of 2010.  Joshua Tree National Park wildlife, including desert bighorn sheep, bobcats, desert mule deer, and mountain lions, cross the park boundary to drink from Big Morongo’s year-round springs, which  enable these animals to survive the harsh summers of the desert.

 

The LADWP’s proposed power line would have cut directly through the Area of Critical Environmental Concern and the proposed National Monument, with construction bulldozing a wide swath in the desert floor, destroying habitat and bisecting the path that leads from Joshua Tree National Park’s rugged wilderness to life-sustaining water.

 

“The leadership of the California Desert Coalition was absolutely essential in securing this major victory for Joshua Tree National Park,” said Cipra. “This was a case of many people caring about their national park and their community, and speaking out about their concerns.  We credit the City of Los Angeles for listening—our national parks and their wildlife are worth protecting.”

 

“Our coalition feels that this is a win for pristine desert lands and the voices of real people who speak out to protect the land they care about,” said Ruth Rieman, vice-chair of the California Desert Coalition.  “This historic victory should give confidence to others who want to protect the desert.”

 

For more information, visit: http://www.cadesertco.org/

 

                                     ###

Close

Want to learn more about the  ?

The   can be seen in the wild in America’s national parks. Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect parks in   & other states

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect   and other National Parks

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Please leave this field empty
Yes, please sign me up for NPCA’s newsletter and other emails about protecting our national parks!

National Parks Conservation Association
National Parks Conservation Association

Log In

Or log in with your connected Facebook or Twitter account:

GO

Welcome to our growing community of park advocates. Thanks for signing up!

Sign Up:

Or sign up by connecting your Facebook or Twitter account:

GO