Experts to Discuss Impacts of Climate Legislation

 
PRESS RELEASE
  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date:   March 19, 2009
Contact:   Danielle Blank, Yellowstone Regional Coordinator, National Parks Conservation Association, 406.222.4478


Experts to Discuss Impacts of Climate Legislation

On Thursday, March 26th, a panel of experts will discuss policy options for addressing climate change at a national level and their implications for Montana residents. They’ll also tackle questions such as: Will our energy prices rise? What’s the cost of not taking action now? How will the government use money that could be raised by taxing carbon or selling carbon permits? This is the final event of a four-part lecture series on climate change.

“From melting glaciers to increased forest fires, Montanans stand to lose a lot if climate change goes unaddressed. This is an exciting opportunity to discuss how federal climate change solutions would work, and what they would look like on the ground here in Montana,” said Danielle Blank of the nonprofit National Parks Conservation Association, the nation’s leading voice for national parks.

President Obama and members of Congress have committed to swift action to reduce our national greenhouse gas emissions, and are engaged in active discussions about the best way to do that.  At this Big Sky event, experts from the energy generation sector, public service, and non-profit community will discuss laws being considered to address climate change, including a market based cap-and-trade system or a carbon tax.

The event, titled “Climate Change Solutions for the West,” will feature panelists Ken Toole, Montana Public Service Commissioner, Mark Lambrecht, PPL Montana, and Diego Rivas, Montanans for a Healthy Climate.

This lecture series, called “The Heat is On: Climate Change in the Yellowstone Ecosystem,” has been organized by the National Parks Conservation Association, the Big Sky Institute, and the Big Sky Chamber of Commerce, and co-sponsored by Big Sky Resort.

The discussion will begin at 7 p.m. in the Big Sky Community Library at the Ophir School. It is free and open to the public, and will be followed by a reception with light refreshments.

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