Donald Ayer Joins Board of National Parks Conservation Association

 
PRESS RELEASE
  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date:   June 4, 2008
Contact:   Andrea Keller Helsel, National Parks Conservation Association, P: 202.454.3332


Donald Ayer Joins Board of National Parks Conservation Association

Washington, D.C. – Donald B. Ayer, partner in the D.C. office of the international law firm, Jones Day, has been elected to the Board of Trustees of the National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA). The board is the governing body for the nonprofit, which is the nation’s leading voice for national parks.

“Donald Ayer is a wonderful addition to NPCA’s board,” said NPCA President Tom Kiernan. “His vast knowledge of the legal system and passion for our national parks will prove to be invaluable to this organization.”

Prior to entering private practice in 1990, Ayer spent approximately ten years in the United States Department of Justice, including two presidential appointments. He worked in California, first as an assistant United States attorney, and from 1981-1986 as United States attorney in Sacramento. From 1986-1989, he served as principal deputy to Solicitor General Charles Fried. In 1989, he was appointed deputy attorney general by President Bush. 

Ayer currently serves as an adjunct professor at the Georgetown and NYU Law Schools. He is listed in the Best Lawyers in America and is a member of the American Academy of Appellate Lawyers, the American Law Institute, the American Bar Foundation, the Publications Committee of the Supreme Court Historical Society, the Advisory Boards of the Supreme Court Institute (Georgetown Univ.), the Institute for Judicial Administration (NYU), and the State and Local Legal Center.

Since 2001, Ayer has served on the National Council of NPCA.

Since 1919, the nonpartisan National Parks Conservation Association has been the leading voice of the American people in the fight to safeguard our National Park System. NPCA, its members, and partners work together to protect the park system and preserve our nation’s natural, historical, and cultural heritage for generations to come.

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