Arizona Resident Receives National Education Award

 
PRESS RELEASE
  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date:   November 19, 2004
Contact:   Laura Loomis, NPCA, 202-454-3918


Arizona Resident Receives National Education Award

Washington, D.C.— - Sue Fischer, a park ranger and exhibits specialist at Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument in Flagstaff, Ariz., yesterday received the National Freeman Tilden Award from the National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA) and the National Park Service for her commitment to education and fostering stewardship of the national parks.

“In working with a variety of partners to create an interactive, engaging educational exhibit about Sunset Crater Volcano, Sue Fischer has provided park visitors with new ways to understand why this place is so special,” said Tom Kiernan, president of NPCA, who presented the award at the National Association for Interpretation Workshop in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

About 900 years after its last eruption, Sunset Crater remains the youngest volcano on the Colorado Plateau. Fischer’s exhibit includes a number of interactive pieces. A large yellow square on the floor with “Jump here” on its middle invites visitors to make their own earthquake; a replica ponderosa pine tree introduces visitors to species in the area, and to using tree ring analysis as a scientific tool; and although the volcano’s summit trail was closed to the public in the 1970s, visitors can see the volcano’s crater by using a computer tour. Working in partnership with the Museum of Northern Arizona, Hopi and Navajo representatives, and Northern Arizona University as well as with park staff, Ms. Fischer has developed an interactive and highly educational interpretive exhibit that presents the park’s resources and story in an engaging way to park visitors. Since the exhibit has opened, visitors have stayed longer and been more involved in the exhibit. “Sue Fischer is devoted to educating the public,” Kiernan said.

The annual National Freeman Tilden Award, co-sponsored by NPCA and the National Park Service since 1982, recognizes outstanding contributions to the public through interpretation by a Park Service employee. Revered as an author, philosopher, and master of interpretation, Freeman Tilden (1884-1980) was a champion of America’s national parks who continues to inspire millions of visitors and park interpreters.

Close

Want to learn more about the  ?

The   can be seen in the wild in America’s national parks. Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect parks in   & other states

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect   and other National Parks

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Please leave this field empty
Yes, please sign me up for NPCA’s newsletter and other emails about protecting our national parks!

National Parks Conservation Association
National Parks Conservation Association

Log In

Or log in with your connected Facebook or Twitter account:

GO

Welcome to our growing community of park advocates. Thanks for signing up!

Sign Up:

Or sign up by connecting your Facebook or Twitter account:

GO