Stratton Joins National Parks Protection Group

 
PRESS RELEASE
  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date:   October 29, 2002
Contact:   Joan Frankevich, NPCA Alaska Regional Office, 907-277-6722


Stratton Joins National Parks Protection Group

Washington, DC - Jim Stratton, currently director of the Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation for the Alaska Department of Natural Resources, will join the National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA) staff in early December as director of the Alaska regional office in Anchorage.
"Jim has had an exceptional 22-year career in environmental protection," says Tom Kiernan, NPCA president. "We are looking forward to applying his talents to the many complex issues facing Alaska's national parks."
Stratton will direct NPCA efforts to protect the integrity of Alaska's majestic national parks. He will work with the National Park Service and others in park planning and will help safeguard Alaska's national parks from exploitative interests so that the parks remain a vital element in state tourism.
Through his work in the Alaska Department of Natural Resources, Stratton established the state's first trails-protection program and negotiated trail easements from willing private property donors. He also expanded Shuyak Island State Park by 36,000 acres, making the entire island a state park.
"We need to work closely with the National Park Service to ensure that Alaska's national parks can continue to provide excellent, meaningful experiences, whether backpacking or on a bus, while protecting their wild character," says Stratton. "Alaska is home of some of the wildest national parks in the country, so we need to be extra diligent to ensure they stay that way."
"Jim Stratton brings to NPCA and to its role in protecting Alaska's national parks an understanding of the outdoor recreational dynamics of park visitors and the need to protect the unique wild lands and wild waters found within national park boundaries," says Kiernan. "NPCA is very happy to have him on board."

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