Conservation Group Prepares Second Lawsuit to Require TVA Compliance with Clean Air Act

 
PRESS RELEASE
  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date:   October 30, 2000
Contact:   Andrea Keller, NPCA, 202-454-3332


Conservation Group Prepares Second Lawsuit to Require TVA Compliance with Clean Air Act

Clinton, TN - The National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA) today announced its intent to sue the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for emitting more than 3 million tons of smog and acid rain pollutants from coal-fired power plants in violation of the federal Clean Air Act. Scientific evidence links this pollution to visibility degradation and acid rain damage in Great Smoky Mountains, Shenandoah, and other national parks in the eastern United States.

TVA's excessive nitrogen oxide emissions alone (approximately 2 million tons) are equivalent to emissions from 10 million cars driven for 10 years.

"The Clean Air Act instructed us 23 years ago to remedy existing damage and prevent future deterioration," said Don Barger, NPCA Southeast Regional Director. "It's time to stop wondering whether to clean the air and begin doing it."

In early October, NPCA sued TVA for separate Clean Air Act violations at two Tennessee plants. This new action addresses plants in Tennessee, Kentucky, and Alabama.

"These plants forfeited the Clean Air Act's grandfather exemption when they were upgraded years ago," said Tom Kiernan, NPCA President. "TVA should have simultaneously installed state-of-the-art pollution controls. Now it is time to clean up these belching dinosaurs."

Among America's most polluted national parks, Great Smoky Mountains was named to NPCA's list of the Top Ten Endangered Parks of 2000.

Named in NPCA's 60-day notice of intent to sue are the following power plants: Johnsonville Fossil Plant, New Johnsonville, Tennessee; the Paradise Fossil Plant, Drakesboro, Kentucky; the Shawnee Fossil Plant, Paducah, Kentucky; the Colbert Fossil Plant, Tuscumbia, Alabama; the Widows Creek Fossil Plant, Stevenson, Alabama; the Allen Fossil Plant, Memphis, Tennessee; the Cumberland Fossil Plant, Cumberland City, Tennessee; the Bull Run Fossil Plant, Clinton, Tennessee; the John Sevier Fossil Plant, Rogersville, Tennessee, and the Kingston Fossil Plant, Kingston, Tennessee.

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