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YOU can help protect your national parks!

Help us reach our $401,000 goal by 12/31 so we can start 2015 strong defending them.

The national parks are yours.

Make your year-end, tax-deductible contribution to protect them today!

YOU can help protect your national parks!

Help us reach our $401,000 goal by 12/31 so we can start 2015 strong defending them.

The national parks are yours.

Make your year-end, tax-deductible contribution to protect them today!

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Photo: National Park Service

Parks

Who We Are | Our Parks| Our Programs

Mid-Atlantic Field Office: DC, Maryland, West Virginia

District of Columbia 

Carter G. Woodson Home

Dr. Carter G. Woodson, who began his formal education at age 20 and went on to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard University, lived in this home on 9th street until his death in 1950. Dr. Woodson is considered the father of African American History and the founder of what is now The Association for the Study of African-American Life and History. This park is currently in need of rehabilitation and closed to the public.  

Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park

Originally built to transport coal, lumber, grain and other agricultural products, the 184 miles of this historical park showcase American transportation history while providing a beautiful place for visitors to hike and bike along the waterway. Noted park features include the Great Falls Tavern, which opened as a hotel in 1831 and now serves as a visitor center, the Pawpaw Tunnel, and a number of aqueducts with its largest, the Monocacy Aqueduct.  

Constitution Gardens

Managed as part of the National Mall and Memorials, this garden features an island memorial to the signers of the Declaration of Independence.  

Ford's Theatre National Historic Site

President Abraham Lincoln was shot April 14th 1865 in the Ford's Theatre and died the next morning at the Petersen House across the street. This park is an active theatre and reopened in 2009 after major renovations.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt National Memorial

Managed as part of the National Mall and Memorials, this park is a memorial to the 32nd president who led the country during the Great Depression and the beginning of World War II.  

Frederick Douglass National Historic Site

Home of the famous orator, abolitionist and statesman, this park is a compelling window into the past.

Korean War Veterans National Memorial

19 stainless steel sculptures commemorate the Korean War in this memorial, which is managed as part of the National Mall and Memorials.  

Lincoln Memorial National Memorial

The resolute marble columns that surround a sculpture of the Great Emancipator sit at the western end of its Reflecting Pool on the National Mall. Some of Lincoln's most famous speeches are carved on the walls.  

Lyndon Baines Johnson Memorial Grove on the Potomac

Located on an island in the Potomac River, this memorial to our 36th president is accessed by car or foot from sites in Virginia, including the George Washington Memorial Parkway.

Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site

Mary McLeod Bethune was an educator and activist for gender and racial equality. This park was both her home and the first headquarters of the National Council of Negro Women.

National Capital Parks--East

Includes a rich diversity of sites in Washington, D.C. including the 1,200-acre Anacostia Park along the banks of the Anacostia River, Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, and the Fort Circle Parks that protect Fort Dupont and other fortifications to defend Washington during the Civil War.  

National Mall and Memorial Parks

Encompassing presidential and war memorials as well as being the site of numerous festivals and events, the National Mall provides the civic stage for our American democracy.

Pennsylvania Avenue National Historic Site

The path of the presidential inaugural parade also includes the United States Navy Memorial, Freedom Plaza, The Old Post Office Tower, the American Expeditionary Forces Memorial, and Pershing Park.  

Rock Creek Park

An oasis of green in busy Washington, Rock Creek Park extends from the northern parts of the city almost to the National Mall and Memorials. It features many opportunities for recreation from in-line skating to a quiet walk in the woods, and provides a haven for wildlife. It includes the   Peirce Mill gristmill, built in the 1820s, and is being restored to be operable again after closing down operations in 1993.  

Theodore Roosevelt Island National Memorial

This wooded island sanctuary is a memorial to our 26th President, the conservation-minded Theodore Roosevelt. Access by foot and vehicle is from Virginia.  

Thomas Jefferson Memorial National Memorial

As president, philosopher and diplomat, Thomas Jefferson's words and ideas shaped the founding of the country. His memorial sits in a beautiful rotunda on the National Mall surrounded, in the spring, by the famous cherry blossoms.

Maryland

Download a map of national parks in Maryland (PDF, 322 KB)

Antietam National Battlefield

On September 17,1862, more than 23,000 soldiers were killed, wounded, or missing in the battle at Antietam, a pivotal battle in the Civil War. Visitors can take a self-guided 8.5 mile tour of the battlefield by car, bicycle or on foot. The park includes the Antietam National Cemetery, which honors 5,000 Union soldiers who died in the battle.

Appalachian National Scenic Trail

One of the most famous and longest trails in the United States, the Appalachian National Scenic Trail crosses West Virginia in the Eastern panhandle. Visitors can hike its entirety between Georgia and Maine, or hop on parts of the trail for weekends or day hikes. 

Assateague Island National Seashore

A narrow island between Maryland and Virginia's Eastern Shore and the Atlantic Ocean, Assateague is home to herds of famous feral ponies as well as abundant native wildlife. Visitors can hike, camp, crab, and enjoy the wild beach.

Catoctin Mountain Park

Filled with diverse species of native wildlife, Catoctin Mountain is also the site of the presidential retreat, Camp David.

Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park

Originally built to transport coal, lumber, grain and other agricultural products, the 184 miles of this historical park showcase American transportation history while providing a beautiful place for visitors to hike and bike along the waterway. Noted park features include the Great Falls Tavern, which opened as a hotel in 1831 and now serves as a visitor center, the Pawpaw Tunnel, and a number of aqueducts with its largest, the Monocacy Aqueduct.  

Clara Barton National Historic Site

Clara Barton's home served as the headquarters for the Red Cross, an organization that she founded, and as a storehouse for disaster relief supplies. Visitors can see 11 rooms that have been restored to their 19th century appearance.

Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine

During the War of 1812, Baltimore was defended by Fort McHenry--a star-shaped fort perfectly situated on a point jutting into Baltimore Harbor.  Francis Scott Key viewed the battle on a British ship where he was held offshore, and subsequently penned "The Star-Spangled Banner," a poem that became our national anthem.

Fort Washington

More than 180 years old, Fort Washington was built on a high bluff above the Potomac River to defend Washington, DC.

Greenbelt Park

Camping and hiking are available just 13 miles from Washington DC at Greenbelt Park.  

Hampton National Historic Site

This mansion was the largest dwelling in America when it was built in 1790.  

Harpers Ferry National Historical Park

As a vital early American town, Harpers Ferry was a staging point for the Lewis and Clark expedition, and in 1859 abolishonist John Brown's raid on the federal armory helped spark the U.S. Civil War. In 1906, Storer College in Harpers Ferry hosted a seminal meeting of early civil rights leaders. These sites from American history as well as sites from the 1862 seige and defense of Harpers Ferry are part of the national park.

Monocacy National Battlefield

The battle at Monocacy River helped protect Washington, D.C. from Confederate advances under Gen. Jubal Early in 1864.  

Piscataway Park

Protecting the view from George Washington's home across the river at Mount Vernon, Piscataway Park offers visitors walks along the Potomac River across freshwater tidal wetlands and on forested trails, and the oppportunity to view remarkable wildlife including beaver and the American bald eagle.

Thomas Stone National Historic Site

At the restored plantation home of Thomas Stone, signer of the Declaration of Independence, visitors can see Revolutionary history interpreted.  

West Virginia

Appalachian National Scenic Trail
This nearly 2,200 mile trail traverses through the Appalachian Mountains, from Georgia to Maine. 

Bluestone National Scenic River
South of New River Gorge National River, the Bluestone National Scenic River protects 10.5 miles of the river and offers hiking, biking, and fishingin this beautiful region of West Virginia.

Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park
Built in the 19th century to connect the Ohio River with the Chesapeake Bay, the C&O Canal had 74 lift locks along its 184.5 mile length. Today, people can bike and hike along the towpath or paddle along the watered portions of the canal.

Gauley River National Recreation Area 
Seven miles north of the New River Gorge National River, Gauley River NRA affords visitors with world-class whitewater opportunities as well as camping, hiking, and fishing along the Gauley and Meadow Rivers.

Harpers Ferry National Historical Park
Located at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers, Harpers Ferry has many stories to tell about the Civil War. The area also offers a myriad of outdoor recreational opportunities as well as stunning views and  an abundance of wildlife.

Journey Through Hallowed Ground National Heritage Area

National Coal Heritage Area
Visitors to this heritage area can learn about the unique coal mining culture of these 13 southern West Virginia counties.

New River Gorge National River
With over 72,000 protected acres, this national park unit affords the visitor boating, hiking, sightseeing, rock climbing and other recreational opportunities along the New River in southern West Virginia.

Wheeling National Heritage Area  
Set along the Ohio River, visitors to the Wheeling National Heritage Area can walk across the country’s oldest vehicular suspension bridge, visit the historic market, and view preserved architecture from throughout the city’s history.
  

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