Alaska Regional Reports

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The Alaska Citizen’s Guide to Natural Gas Permitting

This useful guide helps citizens understand the complex process of natural gas development in Alaska, which is happening closer to national parks, towns and people than ever before in Alaska’s history.  The Citizen’s Guide outlines the risks associated with gas development (including new roads, traffic, noise, habitat disturbance, water pollution and air pollution) and how Alaskans can become informed and involved in guiding gas development in their communities.

View Cover (PDF, 6.5 MB)
View Part 1 (pp. 1-19) (PDF, 10.2 MB, 20 pages)
View Part 2 (pp. 20-end) (PDF, 8.4 MB, 31 pages)

Katmai National Park and Preserve Economic Significance Analysis and Model Documentation

The purpose of this study is twofold. The first is to conduct an economic significance analysis of visitation to Katmai National Park and Preserve (Katmai NPP) using a standard economic input/output model. The second and equally important objective is to compare the National Park Service's Money Generating Model (MGM) methodology with this more general and adaptable approach to assessing economic significance of national parks in Alaska.

View Full Report (PDF, 758 KB, 60 pages)
View Summary (PDF, 1.8 MB, 4 pages)

Who's Counting?

NPCA's Who's Counting? report examines the data available to the National Park Service in considering the management of wildlife populations. The report concludes that increased support for park science would yield more informed wildlife management decisions, and calls on the Park Service to increase support for conducting and analyzing population science for hunted species, support regularly scheduled community harvest surveys, and to support a new position for a statewide wildlife data manager.

View Full Report (PDF, 2.2 MB, 23 pages)

Report Cover 

 Minding the Gap

One of the recommendations in Who's Counting? calls on the Park Service to increase support for conducting and analyzing population science for hunted species such as wolf, moose, caribou, brown bear and Dall sheep.  NPCA’s research shows that in most parks and for most species increased funding for expanding existing research programs and/or starting new ones where no research has been done to date would provide the park service with much better baseline population information for these hunted species.   In addition to increasing each park’s base budget for wildlife research, the report also recommends developing a program to recruit and train the next generation of field biologists and to expand park service partnerships with universities to help with the workload.

View Full Report (PDF, 6.7 MB, 100 pages)

Report Cover

 And The Wildlife Therein

NPCA’s story of how these two wildlife reports were developed in partnership with the National Park Service was recently told in the June 2009 Issue of Alaska Park Science.

View Article (PDF,250 KB, 4 pages)

Report Cover

 

Center for State of the Parks Reports

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