Redwood National and State Parks

Center for the State of the Parks: Park Assessments

Published December 2008


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Redwood National and State Parks protect a primeval landscape where towering coast redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens), the world’s tallest living organisms, thrive. Visitors can feel small as they stroll in the shadows of these enormous trees, explore rocky undeveloped beaches, fern studded canyons, open prairie, oak woodlands, and fog-filled river valleys. These diverse habitats support myriad wildlife and plant species, including several rare species.

According to an assessment by NPCA’s Center for State of the Parks, current overall conditions of Redwood’s known natural resources rated a “fair” score of 69 out of 100. Park staff continue to work to correct past ecosystem damage that resulted from unsustainable logging practices and incompatible upstream development. These efforts include watershed restoration (road removal and erosion control) monitoring, and vegetation management. This work is carried out by park staff and a broad-based coalition of external partners.

Redwood National and State Park’s cultural resources received a “fair” score of 66 out of 100. These cultural resources include 19th-century ranch structures, a World War II-era radar station disguised as a farmhouse, a wealth of archaeological resources, an expansive museum collection and archives, and a rich history of American Indian and Euro-American use. Among the items visitors can see at the park is a redwood dugout canoe on display within the Kuchel Visitor Center; historic stone tools, arrowheads, other carved items made by American Indians; and pieces from local, modern American Indian culture.

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