Point Reyes National Seashore Reassessment

Center for the State of the Parks: Park Assessments

Published February 2009


View   Full Report
(PDF, 3.3 MB, 24 pages)

View Fact Sheet
(PDF, 192 KB, 2 pages)

 

 

Point Reyes National Seashore, established in 1962, is the only national seashore on the West Coast. It features windswept beaches, coastal cliffs and headlands, marine terraces, coastal uplands, salt marshes, estuaries, and coniferous forests. Located on the Point Reyes Peninsula, 40 miles northwest of San Francisco, the park encompasses about 71,070 acres, stretched across more than 80 miles of undeveloped coastline. Within the park, 32,730 acres are designated wilderness or potential wilderness, constituting one of the most accessible wilderness areas in the country, and the only marine wilderness (Drakes Estero) on the West Coast south of Alaska.

In 2002, the National Parks Conservation Association’s Center for State of the Parks assessed the conditions of the natural and cultural resources within Point Reyes National Seashore. The center revisited the park in 2007 to reassess resource conditions, highlight continuing issues as well as new developments at the park, and report on how the conditions of natural and cultural resources have progressed since 2002.

Since NPCA’s initial resource assessment, park staff have continued efforts to remove invasive non-native species and restore rare, threatened, and endangered plants. Staff have also finished several projects aimed at restoring tidal marsh plain habitat, and they continue work to restore tidal wetlands at Tomales Bay to improve water quality, wildlife habitat, flood control and public recreation. The park has hired a temporary preservation crew to care for its hundreds of historic structures. The crew has completed more than 100 projects so far. Museum collections have been inventoried and consolidated into a single storage location.

To find out more about natural and cultural resources at Point Reyes National Seashore, read NPCA's full report.

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