Southern California's Mediterranean Biome Parks

Center for the State of the Parks: Park Assessments

Published April 2008


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(PDF, 19.2 MB, 120 pages)

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Introduction

Channel Islands National Park
Full Chapter | Summary

Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area
Full Chapter | Summary

Cabrillo National Monument
Full Chapter| Summary

Methodology and Acknowledgments

The Mediterranean biome is one of the rarest and most biologically diverse ecotypes on the planet, and because it has been favored by humans for thousands of years, it is one of the most highly altered as well. Covering a mere 2 percent of Earths total land area in five distinct regions, this biome is characterized by evergreen or drought-resistant deciduous shrublands, located on western coasts between 30° to 40° latitudenorth and south.

In the United States, three national parks are part of the Park Services Mediterranean Coast Network and exist entirely within the Mediterranean biome: Channel Islands National Park, Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, and Cabrillo National Monument. Recognizing the unique natural and cultural resources resident in the Mediterranean biome, the Center for State of the Parks endeavored to determine the conditions of natural and cultural resources in these three national parks.

Center for State of the Parks® researchers used established, peer-reviewed methodologies to systemically rate conditions of both natural and cultural resources at Channel Islands National Park, Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, and Cabrillo National Monument. Southern California's Mediterranean Biome Parks: A Resource Assessment describes these sites and their significance, and summarizes resource conditions. Also noted are funding and staffing considerations, park planning efforts, resource education opportunities, and external support provided by volunteers and partner organizations.

What You Can Do To Help Southern California's Mediterranean Biome Parks

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