Close Window ☒

YOU can help protect your national parks!

Help us reach our $401,000 goal by 12/31 so we can start 2015 strong defending them.

The national parks are yours.

Make your year-end, tax-deductible contribution to protect them today!

YOU can help protect your national parks!

Help us reach our $401,000 goal by 12/31 so we can start 2015 strong defending them.

The national parks are yours.

Make your year-end, tax-deductible contribution to protect them today!

Gift Amount
Photo: National Park Service

Cumberland Island National Seashore

Center for the State of the Parks: Park Assessments

Published March 2009


View Full Report
(PDF, 6.8 MB, 44pages)

View Fact Sheet
(PDF, 199 KB, 2 pages)

Cumberland Island National Seashore preserves significant cultural and natural resources, including a Georgian Revival mansion, the remains of 19th-century slave quarters, nearly 204,000 museum artifacts and archives, a multitude of ecosystems, miles of undeveloped sandy beaches, and more than 9,000 acres of federally designated wilderness. The park interprets the history of the island, which was one of the premiere leisure destinations for some of the nation’s most powerful and influential families. In addition, visitors have the chance to glimpse some of the numerous plant and animal species that reside on the island and in adjacent waters, including several threatened or endangered species such as the North Atlantic right whale, Florida manatee, wood stork, piping plover, loggerhead sea turtle, and green sea turtle.

According to an assessment by NPCA’s Center for State of the Parks, current overall conditions of Cumberland Island’s known cultural resources rated a “poor” score of 55 out of 100. Challenges to the park’s cultural resources include unfunded staff positions, lack of planning and management documents, and difficulty maintaining numerous historic structures with limited funding.

Cumberland Island’s natural resources received a “fair” score of 74 out of 100. The report cites issues with invasive non-native animals and plants, water degradation from feral animals and surrounding land uses, and resource deterioration caused by adjacent development and past land uses on the island.

Close

Want to learn more about the  ?

The   can be seen in the wild in America’s national parks. Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect parks in   & other states

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Sign up to protect   and other National Parks

Why not join the National Parks Conservation Association Community to protect and preserve our national parks?

Please leave this field empty
Yes, please sign me up for NPCA’s newsletter and other emails about protecting our national parks!

National Parks Conservation Association
National Parks Conservation Association

Log In

Or log in with your connected Facebook or Twitter account:

GO

Welcome to our growing community of park advocates. Thanks for signing up!

Sign Up:

Or sign up by connecting your Facebook or Twitter account:

GO