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Help us reach our $401,000 goal by 12/31 so we can start 2015 strong defending them.

The national parks are yours.

Make your year-end, tax-deductible contribution to protect them today!

YOU can help protect your national parks!

Help us reach our $401,000 goal by 12/31 so we can start 2015 strong defending them.

The national parks are yours.

Make your year-end, tax-deductible contribution to protect them today!

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Photo: National Park Service

Tennessee's Civil War National Parks

Center for the State of the Parks: Park Assessments

Published May 2009

 

View Fact Sheet
(PDF, 178 KB, 2 pages)

Download by section:

Introduction

Fort Donelson National Battlefield
Full Chapter | Summary

Shiloh National Military Park
Full Chapter| Summary

Stones River National Battlefield
Full Chapter | Summary

Chickamauga & Chattanooga National Military Park
Full Chapter| Summary

Appendix

The American Civil War, fought from 1861 to 1865, is the deadliest war in U.S. history, resulting in more than 620,000 deaths. Dozens of battlefields and other sites from this era are protected, serving as important historic resources as well as places for solemn reflections. The National Park Service manages four significant battle sites in the state of Tennessee: Fort Donelson National Battlefield, Shiloh National Military park (part of park lies in Mississippi), Stones River National Battlefield, and Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park (part of park lies in Georgia).

According to an assessment by the Center for State of the Parks, cultural resources at Fort Donelson, Shiloh, and Chickamauga and Chattanooga are in “fair” condition, while cultural resources at Stones River are in “good” condition. Natural resource conditions received “fair” scores at Shiloh and Chickamauga and Chattanooga. Natural resource conditions were not assessed at Fort Donelson and Stones River due to a lack of sufficient information.

The parks face several common challenges. Primary among them are funding shortfalls that limit the Park Service’s ability to preserve historic sites and tell the stories of our American heritage. Also of critical concern at all four parks is adjacent development that mars historical and scenic views that are essential to interpreting American history and providing visitors with a memorable experience.

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