Bryce Canyon National Park

Center for the State of the Parks: Park Assessments

Published June 2005


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First proclaimed a national monument in June 1923, Bryce Canyon National Park includes 35,835 acres of breathtaking spires, hoodoos, and windows carved by wind from colorful sedimentary rock. The park is home to more than 500 plant species and many bird and mammal species, and tells the stories of humans who have lived in the area for thousands of years.

Today, Bryce Canyon natural resources are in "good" condition. Air quality in the park is generally excellent; scenic vistas can stretch for up to 200 miles. The park's dark, starry nights are renown. Park staff keep non-native species in check, and have successfully reintroduced federally-threatened Utah prairie dogs.

Overall condition of Bryce Canyon's cultural resources is another matter. NPCA rated these as in "poor" condition. Due to funding shortfalls, staff is limited and the park's archive and museum collection, including old furnishings; historic structures including an old Standard Oil service station; archaeological sites that date back thousands of years; and other treasures need greater protection.

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